Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Ground Breaking Planting in Christchurch

Ground Breaking Planting in Christchurch


What is quite possibly the first Food Forest in Christchurch was planted yesterday.

Spokesperson for the Sumner Community Garden organisation which is undertaking the project, Lucy Loughnan, says more than 50 different trees and berries were planted on Sunday morning in the grounds of the Van Asch School grounds, the culmination of many months of planning and hard work.

“We have had essential support and advice from a professional permaculturist who completed a site specific plan for our forest which was designed by a team of eight, and we have held several working bees involving up to 50 community members,” says Lucy Loughnan.

Hagley Ferrymead City Councillor Paul Lonsdale joined the organisation in the school grounds as the trees and plants went in.

“The weather wasn’t great yesterday but that didn’t stop this hardy bunch getting the job done. I am hugely supportive of the project and congratulate the community on leading this initiative,” he said.

The group also planted a number of different species around the base of the trees; a set of companion plants that work in harmony with each species, as well as supporting their growth and fruit production.

With minimal effort, apart from pruning and seasonal mulching, over time the food forest will look after itself, enabling the community to be able to wander through the forest and pick the fruit and berries as they ripen, says Lucy Loughnan.

“We have deliberately chosen plants that are suitable to our area, varieties that are not available in shops, and a selection of varieties that will fruit across the whole season so there will always be something to see in the food forest.”

Loughnan says the food forest is like a normal "native forest" with layers, or canopies, each with its own purpose, and also providing habitats for native wildlife.

“A food forest has seven layers, each providing different environments for different edible plant or trees. Using the concept of permaculture, each tree or plant has an additional purpose, as they are chosen to either supplement or provide nutrition, provide shelter, draw beneficial insects/wildlife, provide pollinators, detract unwanted insects, and so on,” she says.

From nuts at the very top; apple trees in the next level; citrus in sun, and shelter, stone fruit to ripen in the sun; feijoa that can tolerate wind; climbers that can climb up tall trees; bushes such as berries or currants, and lower levels of strawberries, herbs; soil conditioners like comfrey and the like - all are planned and planted using companion planting, so that in about seven years when the trees are reaching maturity, it is self-sustaining, with virtually little maintenance required. A bit of pruning in the winter, and just chop and drop of the plants that provide nutrition at the bases, as they will breakdown where they fall feeding the trees.

Lucy Loughnan says these tasks could easily be incorporated into educational opportunities.

“We have many schools and pre-schools who visit our garden on a regular basis and this will be a further educational opportunity for them.”

She adds that from the research undertaken by the Sumner Community Garden organisation, these projects will be of interest to many who will be visiting Christchurch and they are confident the fruit forest will be another attraction for Sumner.


ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

PARLIAMENT TODAY:

Salvation Army On Homelessness: Hard Times In West Auckland

The report details an uncomfortable story of people whose only option is to live an unhealthy, dangerous and damaging street life... The social housing needed by these people is not currently available in sufficient quantity. More social housing is required in the West. More>>

ALSO:

Message For PM: NZ Supports Te Reo Māori – You Should Too

As Māori Language Week celebrations and commemoration of 40 years draws to an end, the Māori Language Commission, Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori, is once again hugely encouraged by the widespread support for Māori language from throughout the country ... More>>

ALSO:

Arming Police: Frontline Police To Routinely Carry Tasers

"In making the decision, the Police executive has considered almost five years worth of 'use of force' data… It consistently shows that the Taser is one of the least injury-causing tactical options available when compared with other options, with a subject injury rate of just over one per cent for all deployments." More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On D-Day For Dairy At The TPP

While New Zealand may feel flattered at being called “the Saudi Arabia of milk” it would be more accurate to regard us as the suicide bombers of free trade. More>>

ALSO:

Leaked Letter: Severe Restrictions on State Owned Enterprises

Even an SOE that exists to fulfil a public function neglected by the market or which is a natural monopoly would nevertheless be forced to act "on the basis of commercial considerations" and would be prohibited from discriminating in favour of local businesses in purchases and sales. Foreign companies would be given standing to sue SOEs in domestic courts for perceived departures from the strictures of the TPP... More>>

ALSO:

"Gutted" Safety Bill: Time To Listen To Workplace Victims’ Families

Labour has listened to the families of whose loved ones have been killed at work and calls on other political parties to back its proposals to make workplaces safer and prevent unnecessary deaths on the job. More>>

ALSO:

Regulators: Govt To ‘Crowd-Source’ Regulatory Advice

A wide-ranging set of reforms is to be implemented to shake up the way New Zealand government agencies develop, write and implement regulations. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
More RSS  RSS News AlertsNews Alerts
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news