Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Design concepts for Transport Projects for consultation

Thursday 7 August 2014

Proposed design concepts for Transport Projects approved for consultation

Christchurch City Council’s Earthquake Recovery Committee of the Whole today endorsed proposed concept designs for two transport projects and gave the go-ahead to start public engagement on them.

Public engagement on Hospital Corner (Stage 1 early works) and Hagley / Moorhouse Corner transport projects is scheduled to begin mid-August 2014 and will take place over a three week period.

These are the first of the proposed transport projects to deliver An Accessible City. This is the transport chapter of the Christchurch Central Recovery Plan developed under the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Act 2011. An Accessible City was prepared by the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority (CERA) in partnership with the Christchurch City Council, Environment Canterbury (ECan) and the NZ Transport Agency.

People initially shared their ideas and viewpoints about transport through the Council’s 2011 ‘Share an Idea’ campaign, more feedback came when CERA consulted on the Draft Transport Chapter of the Central City Recovery Plan (which became An Accessible City) in 2012 and 2013.

The Council and CERA have now developed this feedback into transport projects that focus on changes to traffic flow in the Central City and want to check back with the community on the proposed design concepts for these projects.

Unit Manager Asset and Network Planning, Terry Howes says, “These two transport projects focus on improving traffic flow to anchor projects and are designed to assist pedestrian, cyclist and vehicle movement in and through the Health Precinct. They are a priority as there is a need to get the physical changes to the roading network in place for the opening of the new Bus Interchange in April 2015.

“The anchor project developments mean the way people will travel to the Central City will be different from how they travelled prior to the earthquakes. These transport projects ask us to imagine our new city and how we will move efficiently within it and get to the new destinations.

“The proposed designs for Hospital Corner and Hagley / Moorhouse Corner were arrived at after careful consideration of a range of options. Safety and pedestrian-friendly environments are an important principle in the Council’s design considerations for transport projects and these are reflected in the designs that propose priority areas for pedestrians, low-speed streets in the inner zone and a one-way Tuam Street that will give buses the ‘green wave’ into the new Bus Interchange.

“There will be trade-offs that need to be made in designing for transport and public areas, and given the limited road space (only 20 metres wide) not everyone will get what they would ideally like. The Council’s aim is to provide a transport system to meet the needs of the whole network – this means looking at a big picture view of transport for the whole city and how the various transport projects intersect and support each other.

“They also support the objectives of the Transport Chapter of the Christchurch Central Recovery Plan (An Accessible City) promoting the central city as a destination rather than a through-route by creating a more pedestrian-friendly core with improved and well-connected walking, cycling and public transport facilities and routes,” Mr Howes says.
Chair of the Environmental Committee, Councillor Phil Clearwater says, “The Council looks forward to receiving the views of the community during the upcoming engagement process and I strongly encourage businesses, property owners, organisations and residents to take the opportunity to look at the proposed changes and provide feedback.

“The Council will be holding drop-in sessions where people can view the proposed design concepts, talk to Council and CERA staff and make a response. The Council will also be in contact with key organisations, business and property owners near these projects to make sure they have the information they need about design concepts and how to make a response.

“I am particularly pleased we have included a mechanism for interested people to engage directly with the Council’s Environmental Committee about their concerns and ideas during the course of the engagement. While these design concepts may not fully meet everyone’s needs, it is important we hear peoples’ views and have direct discussions,” he says.

At Hospital Corner, including Oxford Street and Tuam Street, the proposed changes include:
• Oxford Terrace will no longer provide a route for cars heading into the Central City. It will be restricted to hospital and local business access vehicles, taxis, cyclists and pedestrians, with the final layout determined as part of the Te Papa Ōtākaro / Avon River Precinct project works;
• Tuam Street becomes one-way for city-bound traffic and will be in the 30 kilometre per hour zone;
• A separated bus lane heading toward Riccarton on Tuam Street between Antigua Street and Hagley Avenue;
• The bus stop on Oxford Terrace adjacent to the hospital will be relocated to Tuam Street;
• A bus ‘super stop’ is planned on both sides of Tuam Street as part of stage two completion works;
• The existing exit from Christchurch Hospital at Oxford Terrace remains open, but vehicles can only travel south along Antigua Street;
• St Asaph Street is extended as a one-way street westbound all the way to Hagley Park; and
• Overall, there will be a net loss of 51 car parking spaces in the Hospital Corner project area as part of Stage 1 early works. To offset the reduction of on-street car parks, a short-term off-street car park (of around 800 spaces) has been established on the old “Brewery” site on the corner of St Asaph and Antigua Streets.

At Hagley / Moorhouse Corner and surrounding streets proposed changes include:
• Converting Hagley Avenue, Lincoln Road, Grove Road and Moorhouse Avenue intersection to a T-intersection;
• Hagley Avenue will be closed at the Moorhouse Avenue intersection except for a left turn out of Hagley Avenue onto Moorhouse Avenue;
• Hagley Avenue becomes one-way from Selwyn Street to Moorhouse Avenue;
• Provision of 23 additional car parking spaces near the netball courts;
• Overall, there will be a net loss of 14 car parking spaces in the Hagley / Moorhouse project area;
• The existing path in Hagley Park will be widened to a four metre wide shared pedestrian/cycle path; and
• No exit from Grove Road onto Moorhouse Avenue.

To view the proposed concept designs for Hospital Corner and Hagley / Moorhouse Corner click here.

The remaining draft design concepts for the First Phase Transport Projects will come to the Council in September for approval to consult.

– Ends –

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: A Govt. Christmas Bad News Dump -The Skycity Convention Center Blowout & A Negative MBIE Review

If the government really did have good tidings of great joy you can bet it wouldn’t be strewing them about at Christmas time – which is, traditionally, the dumping ground for terrible news that the government fervently hopes the public will be too distracted to notice. And so verily this Christmas Eve we learn of (a) the explosion of costs to the taxpayer and ratepayer of the vile SkyCity convention centre in Auckland and that (b) the government’s flagship MBIE “super-ministry” run by its Minister of Everything is a disaster zone of incompetence and mismanagement. MBIE is a Titanic looking for an iceberg, or so it would seem. More>>

 

Parliament Adjourns:

Greens: CAA Airport Door Report Conflicts With Brownlee’s Claims

The heavily redacted report into the incident shows conflicting versions of events as told by Gerry Brownlee and the Christchurch airport security staff. The report disputes Brownlee’s claim that he was allowed through, and states that he instead pushed his way through. More>>

ALSO:

TAIC: Final Report On Grounding Of MV Rena

Factors that directly contributed to the grounding included the crew:
- not following standard good practice for planning and executing the voyage
- not following standard good practice for navigation watchkeeping
- not following standard good practice when taking over control of the ship. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell:
On The Pakistan Schoolchildren Killings

The slaughter of the children in Pakistan is incomprehensibly awful. On the side, it has thrown a spotlight onto something that’s become a pop cultural meme. Fans of the Homeland TV series will be well aware of the collusion between sections of the Pakistan military/security establishment on one hand and sections of the Taliban of the other… More>>

ALSO:

Werewolf Satire:
The Politician’s Song

am a perfect picture of the modern politic-i-an:
I don’t precisely have a plan so much as an ambition;
‘Say what will sound most pleasant to the public’ is my main dictum:
And when in doubt attack someone who already is a victim More>>

ALSO:

Flight: Review Into Phillip Smith’s Escape Submitted To Government

The review follows an earlier operational review by the Department of Corrections and interim measures put in place by the Department shortly after prisoner Smith’s escape, and will inform the Government Inquiry currently underway. More>>

ALSO:

Intelligence: Inspector-General Accepts Apology For Leak Of Report

The Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security, Cheryl Gwyn, has accepted an unreserved apology from Hon Phil Goff MP for disclosing some of the contents of her recent Report into the Release of Information by the NZSIS in July and August 2011 to media prior to its publication. The Inspector-General will not take the matter any further. More>>

ALSO:

Drink: Alcohol Advertising Report Released

The report of the Ministerial Forum on Alcohol Advertising and Sponsorship has been released today, with Ministers noting that further work will be required on the feasibility and impact of the proposals. More>>

ALSO:

Other Report:

Leaked Cabinet Papers: Treasury Calls For Health Cuts

Leaked Cabinet papers that show that Government has been advised to cut the health budget by around $200 million is ringing alarm bells throughout the nursing and midwifery community. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news