Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Rotorua generally a safe place to live

Rotorua generally a safe place to live: safety perceptions survey

Most residents think Rotorua is generally a safe place to live according to a recently completed perceptions of safety survey commissioned by Rotorua District Council. Survey results show 82 per cent of people surveyed said Rotorua was ‘definitely’ or ‘mostly’ safe while 16 per cent said ‘not really’ or ‘definitely not.’

The survey shows most people also feel safe in the inner city during the daytime but less so at night.

Eighty four per cent of respondents said they felt ‘safe or very safe’ in the CBD during the day but at night time the figure drops to 26 per cent. The presence of other people and police officers were common reasons for feeling safe during the day, while the lesser perceptions of safety at night were frequently explained by ‘people hanging around,’ ‘bar areas,’ and ‘young kids.’

Inner City Revitalisation Strategy portfolio lead, Councillor Karen Hunt, said while the daytime safety levels were pleasingly high they were 3.8 per cent down on last year.

“It’s likely that this is at least in part a reaction to people hanging around shops that were selling legal high substances, a problem we were experiencing at the time the survey was undertaken. That issue is firmly behind us now.

“However I’m encouraged that 84 per cent of those surveyed are aware of the Community Policing Centre in the inner city, 79 per cent know about the liquor ban, 74 per cent about CCTV cameras, and 52 per cent are aware of the council’s City Safe Guardians. Those are all initiatives helping to keep people safe and adding to our key Rotorua 2030 goal to revitalise the inner city area.

Ms Hunt said most of the figures from the survey were “in the same ball park” as last year, and showed residents feel Rotorua is generally a safe place.

People were also asked if they worry about parking their cars in the CBD with thirteen per cent concerned during daytime, down two per cent from last year’s survey. At night 19 per cent worry about their parked cars, three per cent less than last year’s survey. While both figures represent improvement, half the respondents said there were places that were sometimes unsafe to park such as Kuirau Park and the Lakefront.

In local neighbourhoods 88 per cent of people generally feel safe during daytime and 74 per cent at night. In residents’ own homes the figures are even higher with 95 per cent feeling safe during the day and 88 per cent at night.

The survey asked residents if they felt they could trust people. Forty five per cent said ‘yes’ while 41 per cent said ‘you can’t be too careful dealing with people.’

When asked what could be done to make Rotorua a safer place, policing, better parenting, more security, and building and street improvements were most often mentioned.

The top priorities identified for Rotorua over the next few years were better traffic controls, road safety, reducing child and family violence, better parenting and more police presence.

Mayor Steve Chadwick said the survey provided a valuable tool for monitoring how well Rotorua was doing in keeping residents safe.

“Public safety is a shared objective of the council and community and its importance is reflected in our Rotorua 2030 vision and goals.

“Our council remains committed to working in partnership with other organisations and agencies to help build a safe community.”

Council initiatives in support of crime prevention and community safety include its Crime Prevention Plan, City Safe Guardians, a protocol with Rotorua Police and collaborative partnerships with organisations such as the Inner City Focus Group, Treasure Rotorua and Safe Communities Group.

The 2014 Rotorua District Perceptions of Safety Survey was undertaken by Rotorua research company APR Consultants, and involved 499 residents surveyed by telephone and online. The survey results will be available on the council website, rdc.govt.nz, by Friday [5 September].

[ENDS]

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell:
On The Northland By-Election

Supposedly, Winston Peters’ victory in Northland has exposed the simmering dissatisfaction with the government that exists out in the provinces. Yet it remains to be seen whether this defeat will have much significance – and not simply because if and when Labour resumes business as usual in the Northland seat at the next election, Peters’ hold on it could simply evaporate.

On Saturday, National’s electorate vote declined by 7,000 votes, as the 9,000 majority it won last September turned into a 4,000 vote deficit – mainly because Labour supporters followed the nod and wink given by Labour leader Andrew Little, and voted tactically for Peters. In the process, Labour’s vote went down from nearly 9,000 votes six months ago, to only 1,315 on Saturday. More>>

 

PARLIAMENT TODAY:

IPCA Reports: Significant Problems In Police Custody

In releasing two reports today, the Independent Police Conduct Authority has highlighted a number of significant problems with the way in which Police deal with people who are detained in Police cells. More>>

ALSO:

Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security: Inquiry Into GCSB Pacific Allegations

The complaints follow recent public allegations about GCSB activities. The complaints, and these public allegations, raise wider questions regarding the collection, retention and sharing of communications data. More>>

ALSO:

TPPA Investment Leak: "NZ Surrender To US" On Corporates Suing Governments

Professor Jane Kelsey: ‘As anticipated, the deal gives foreign investors from the TPPA countries special rights, and the power to sue the government in private offshore tribunals for massive damages if new laws, or even court decisions, significantly affected their bottom line’. More>>

ALSO:

Werewolf: The Myth Of Steven Joyce

Gordon Campbell: The myth of competence that’s been woven around Steven Joyce – the Key government’s “Minister of Everything” and “Mr Fixit” – has been disseminated from high-rises to hamlets, across the country... More>>

ALSO:

RMTU: No Public Submissions On International Government Procurement Deal

“The government is preparing to assent to the Government Procurement Agreement, a World Trade Organisation Treaty which opens up New Zealand Government contracts to foreign companies and closes the door on local businesses and their workers. However the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Select Committee is refusing to take public submissions on the decision.” More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell:
On Pacific Spying

So New Zealand spied on its friends and allies in the Pacific – and has not only been passing on the results to the NSA, but has apparently passed on the details of the Pacific’s relations with Taiwan to our other best friends, the Chinese. On the side, the Key government has also been using the security services to gauge the chances of Trade Minister Tim Groser landing the top job at the WTO... More>>

ALSO:

State Housing Transfer: Salvation Army Opts Out

The Salvation Army has decided against negotiating with Government for the transfer of Housing New Zealand stock.
More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news