Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


BNZ’s ‘Closed for Good’ volunteer day works magic at Plunket

For immediate release

4 September 2014

BNZ’s ‘Closed for Good’ volunteer day works magic at Plunket

When BNZ staff arrived at Plunket in Featherston this morning to volunteer for the day, they were tasked with a tall order – make our playground magical.

Through BNZ’s annual ‘Closed for Good’ programme, which this year sees almost 4000 staff volunteer for the day at over 460 community projects nationwide, Plunket asked staff from the local BNZ branch to create an inspiring, creative, safe and fun play space for local children.

“It’s amazing. The before and after is just incredible. It was just a bare space, and now we’ve got a beautiful playground – it’s got an obstacle course, a dinosaur garden, stepping logs dug into the ground, a new sandpit, a music wall,” said Karyn Wilkins, Playgroup Coordinator at Plunket Featherston. The music wall has pots, pans and grills fixed to it and a bucket of different kitchen utensils that kids can use, to create a wall of sound.

And if this sounds like the product of a vivid imagination, it is: “I had a vision for how the space would look, I spent many breastfeeding hours on Pinterest making boards,” said Karyn, a Plunket volunteer. But turning her vision into reality demanded a team effort: “We were so delighted to have the team of BNZ volunteers arrive, and they’ve got so much done today, along with three Plunket volunteers. I’m really pleased to see it actually happen and I can’t wait for the first playgroup tomorrow.”

It’s already met with local approval. At first, Lulu North, 4, couldn’t decide which bit she liked the best, but on balance felt the slide was her favourite.

Lisa Hoswell, BNZ Customer Service Consultant, was one of eight staff from the Featherston branch who volunteered: “It’s been fun – I think all of us enjoyed that this was a blank canvas, and you can really see the difference.”

Featherston is one of over 20 Plunket groups across the country to get a helping hand from BNZ staff today. From Auckland in the North to Dunedin in the South, BNZ volunteered at Plunket branches painting fences, brightening up and cleaning toy rooms, and providing financial management and fundraising advice.

“The projects are as diverse as the communities Plunket serves, but they have one thing in common – they help our teams be good with money. The BNZ volunteers step in and do a huge amount of work that may otherwise have to be paid for,” said Claire Rumble, Plunket’s National Community Development Manager.

BNZ’s chief executive Anthony Healy said: “Volunteer service is one of the many ways the company shows its commitment to the communities we have a presence in. We acknowledge that every employee in the bank has a role to play in supporting their communities and environment. That’s why we’re proud to be able to share the skills and expertise of our people with their neighbourhoods for a day.”

– ENDS –


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell:
On The Kim Regime

During the Cuban Missile Crisis, the US had a very clear objective and eventually offered a quid pro quo of the removal of some of its own missiles from Turkey. This time, there’s no clarity about what the US is seeking, or offering.

It hasn’t helped that the US and the global media consistently agree on calling North Korea and its leadership “crazy” and “irrational” and urging it to “come to its senses”. When you treat your opponent as being beyond reason, it gets hard to comprehend what their strategy is, let alone work out the terms of a viable compromise. More>>

 

Recovery: Economic Impact Of Kaikōura Quake Revealed

The report details the impact on small businesses and tourism caused by disruptions to transport infrastructure and the economic impacts... The impact on New Zealand’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) over the first 18 months following the earthquake has been estimated at $450-$500 million. More>>

ALSO:

Human Rights Commission: Urgent Need For Action On Seclusion And Restraint

Chief Human Rights Commissioner David Rutherford says that while the report makes for sobering reading, the focus should now be on how the recommendations can be used to reduce the occurrence of seclusion and restraint in New Zealand and, in circumstances where it is necessary, to improve practices. More>>

ALSO:

CORRECTIONS (March 2017):

SCHOOL SECLUSION ROOMS (2016):

$11bn Capital Spend, New Debt Target: Steven Joyce On Budget Priorities

First, delivering better public services for a growing country – providing all New Zealanders with the opportunity to lead successful independent lives... And finally, we remain committed to reducing the tax burden and in particular the impact of marginal tax rates on lower and middle income earners, when we have the room to do so. More>>

ALSO:

JustSpeak Report: Bail Changes To Blame For New Billion Dollar Prison

In 2013 criminal justice spending was falling and the Government was mulling over what to spend the money on. 3 years later there are 10,000 people in prison and a new billion dollar prison is announced. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news