Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Tiny native frog wins big victory today

Tiny native frog wins big victory today

The accidental discovery twenty-four years ago of a tiny native frog near Te Puke lead to a long-running conservation battle which finally paid off today.

The habitat of the rare frog is today officially classed as conservation sanctuary, allowing it to be protected and giving the rare local Hochstetter’s frogs a chance at long-term survival.

The small, 400-hectare area of land has been the subject of much local debate over the past 20 years. The first frog in the Otawa block was discovered by a volunteer on a Forest & Bird walk, but the organisation was later accused of deliberately putting it there.

The area was quarried from the 1960s, which posed a major threat to the habitat. The frogs' chief champions, the local Forest & Bird branches, were blockaded and accused of trespassing by the quarry owner. Al Fleming, Forest & Bird’s Central North Island Conservation Manager, had the air in his vehicle’s tyres released on one visit.

Mr Fleming says “Members from both Te Puke and Tauranga have fought tenaciously for the welfare of this rare and beautiful frog. Without their combined efforts, the Otawa frog population could have been destroyed by the quarry owner years ago.”

Hochstetter's frogs are as unique to New Zealand as our iconic kiwi and kakapo. They belong to an ancient genus called Leiopelma, which split off from other frog species around the time of the dinosaurs. They exhibit many strange and primitive traits such as being voiceless, lacking external ears, and hatching as tiny froglets instead of tadpoles.

Hochstetter's frogs are divided into 19 genetically distinct populations. The Otawa population is believed to be the smallest, at about 200 individuals, and has been identified as nationally critical – one step away from extinction.

The quarrying ceased in 2009 but the land is still unstable and human disturbance is an issue. The tiny frogs can easily be crushed by walkers, horses or passing vehicles. Despite all these hardships the population of frogs has persisted.

“The frogs now have a chance and the new Sanctuary land status give DOC and the community an opportunity to restore the frogs’ habitat, protect them from predators, and ensure that the frogs’ recovery and protection is a priority.” Mr Fleming says.

“This is a story of persistence and determination. These special animals have been around for a very long time, and Forest & Bird members are proud to have played a role in guaranteeing them a future.”

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Bullish On China Shopping: Trade Minister On Premier's Visit

Q+A: Trade Minister Todd McClay – not ruling out a conversation around Chinese workers coming to New Zealand to work on infrastructure projects as part of trade talks:

‘Yeah, well, that’s not something that’s on the table at the moment, but, look, what we’ve agreed as part of the, you know, when we start the upgrade negotiation, both sides can raise issues that are of importance to them. We’ve got a list of things we want to talk about. China may well have.’ More>>

 

Little Heading For Court: Apology Over Donation/Hotel Contract Claims Not Accepted

Today I want to publicly apologise unreservedly to Mr Hagaman for any hurt, embarrassment or adverse reflection on his reputation which may have resulted from my various media statements. I have offered that apology to the Hagamans. More>>

ALSO:

Biscuit Tin Of Democracy: World Heritage Site Protection, Ombudsman and Equal Pay Bills Drawn

On Thursday, 23 March 2017 three places are available on the Order Paper for the first reading of a Member’s bill. The ballot was held, and resulted in the following bills being drawn... More>>

ALSO:

Emissions Plan: NZ Needs More Science, More Trees, Fewer Beasts

A combination of technology breakthroughs, much more plantation forestry, and a big switch away from pastoral, particularly dairy farming, are identified as the key elements of any approach New Zealand takes to reducing its carbon emissions to a net zero level, according to a new report sponsored by the New Zealand chapter of GLOBE, a multi-party, global parliamentary grouping. More>>

ALSO:

"Backed To Win Seats": Labour Māori Seat MPs Won't Stand On List

The Labour Party is backing a request from its Māori seat MPs to stand as electorate MPs only, says Labour Leader Andrew Little. More>>

OutsKey: John Key's Valedictory Speech

I rise to address this House for the very last time. It has been a huge privilege to have served the people of Helensville as their member of Parliament, and, of course, the people of New Zealand as their Prime Minister. More>>

ALSO:

Productivity Commission: New Models Of Tertiary Education Are Coming

The report is a broad-ranging inquiry into how well New Zealand’s tertiary education system is set up to respond to emerging trends in technology and the internationalisation of education, and changes in the structure of the population, and the skills needed in the economy and society... More>>

ALSO:

PM's Press Conference: Water Everywhere

Monday's Post-Cabinet press conference focused on water, with the Prime Minister fielding questions about the possibility pricing water taken for export. Mr English said the government was directing their water allocation technical advisory group to include export water in considerations. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news