Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 

Bumper season for kiwi egg collection

Bumper season for kiwi egg collection

A bumper harvest of kiwi eggs has marked the first half of this year’s kiwi conservation work in the Maungataniwha Native Forest in inland Hawke’s Bay. Conservationists working for the Forest Lifeforce Restoration Trust have lifted 32 eggs so far, compared to 46 for the entire season last year, and are reporting viability rates of 80 percent as opposed to the normal rate of around 65 percent.

Trust staffer Barry Crene said four of the Trust’s monitored kiwi had abandoned their nests this year, possibly due a very wet Spring. He had received reports of similar behaviour from other kiwi conservation projects across the North Island.

Crene said the Forest Lifeforce Restoration Trust would start lifting eggs from the second clutch before Christmas.

Kiwi eggs from the Trust’s Maungataniwha Kiwi Project are incubated at Kiwi Encounter in Rotorua. Until now all the resulting chicks have been reared in safety at the Cape Sanctuary near Napier. When they are large enough they are released back into the forest from which the eggs were taken.
But growing numbers and pressure on the space available have forced the Trust to find other safe ‘half-way houses’ for the birds to grow.
It is working with the National Aquarium of New Zealand to expand the aquarium’s breeding facility so it can take an extra 30 birds a year, about half the number generated by the Maungataniwha Kiwi Project. The rest will continue to go to the Cape Sanctuary.
“The fact that kiwi conservation initiatives are, between them, producing too many birds for existing rearing facilities to cope with, is testament to the effectiveness of the work being done by hundreds of dedicated people in the back blocks of this country, from Cape Reinga to Bluff,” said Trust Chairman Simon Hall.
The Forest Lifeforce Restoration Trust celebrated recently the return to Maungataniwha of the 200th young adult kiwi raised as part of its kiwi project, ensuring the viability of the population there for the next three decades.
Between inception in 2006 and the end of March last year it had harvested 453 eggs and seen 237 young adults released back into the wild.


The Forest Lifeforce Restoration (FLR) Trust, whose patron is Kiwi icon Rachel Hunter, is fast carving out a name for itself as one of the most prolific and successful kiwi conservation initiatives in the country.

In addition to the Maungataniwha Kiwi Project the Trust runs a series of native flora and fauna regeneration projects. These include a drive to increase the wild-grown population of Kakabeak (Clianthus maximus), an extremely rare type of shrub, and the re-establishment of native plants and forest on 4,000 hectares currently, or until recently, under pine.
- ends –
About the Forest Lifeforce Restoration Trust
The Forest Lifeforce Restoration Trust was established in 2006 to provide direction and funding for the restoration of threatened species of fauna and flora, and to restore the ngahere mauri (forest lifeforce) in native forests within the Central North Island.

It runs eight main regeneration and restoration projects, involving native New Zealand flora and fauna, on three properties in the central North Island. It also owns a property in the South Island’s Fiordland National Park.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

BPS HYEFU WYSIWYG: Labour's Budget Plans, Families Package

“The BPS and the Treasury’s Half Year Economic and Fiscal Update show we can deliver our promises while running sustainable surpluses and paying down debt...

“Today we are announcing the full details of the Government’s Families Package. This is paid for by rejecting National’s tax cuts and instead targeting spending at those who need it most. It will lift 88,000 children out of poverty by 2021." More>>

 
 

Gordon Campbell: On Defence Spending, Alabama, And Dolly Parton

The spending lavished on Defence projects to meet the risks that could maybe, possibly, theoretically face New Zealand in future is breath-taking, given how successive governments have been reluctant to spend even a fraction of those amounts on the nation’s actual social needs. More>>

ALSO:

Members' Bills: End Of Life Choice Bill Passes First Reading

The End of Life Choice Bill in the name of David Seymour has been sent to a select committee for consideration by 76 votes to 44. It is the third time Parliament has voted on the issue in recent decades and the first time such a Bill has made it over the first hurdle. More>>

ALSO:

State Sector: MPI Survives Defrag Of Portfolios

The Ministry for Primary Industries will not be split under the new government, but will instead serve as an overarching body for four portfolio-based entities focused on fisheries, forestry, biosecurity and food safety. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Vulnerable Kids, RNZ Funding, And Poppy

The decision to remove the word ‘vulnerable’ from the Ministry for Vulnerable Children could well mark a whole shift in approach to the care of children in need... More>>

ALSO:

Principals' Federation: End Of National Standards

Today the Minister of Education announced that the Government has stopped the controversial National Standards system of assessment and declared them an arbitrary measure which did not raise children's achievement as the previous Government intended. More>>

ALSO:

Public Good: People’s Report On Public Broadcasting And Media Presented

The People’s Commission on Public Broadcasting and Media, was crowdfunded and was informed by an extensive consultation, seeking the views of both those working in Media as well as gathering input both online and in person from ordinary Citizens. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages