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Rocking new regional network on its way

Rocking new regional network on its way – people get ready to roll with us

The countdown is on to the introduction of an integrated public transport network in Greater Wellington, with major changes happening across the region from Sunday 15 July.

“We’re on our way to an integrated public transport network from July, and to deliver that we are bringing in a new brand on buses, new vehicles and routes, and Snapper on buses for the whole region,” says Greater Wellington Regional Council’s Sustainable Transport Chair Barbara Donaldson. “We’re supporting this with new timetables so that buses and trains better connect, and new fares and flexible ticket types that will allow Metlink customers to go more places more often.

“Every day an average of 100,000 trips are made using public transport across the Wellington region. Each trip is different, so we can’t produce personalised timetables and fare schedules. Signing up to MyMetlink is one of the best ways you can keep up to date with what this actually means for you and how you can be more connected.

“Today we start an information campaign to highlight the range of tools that will help you work out when to catch your service and where, what connections you need to make and what the fare will be. Over the next two months there will be advertising, posters, website updates and mail drops in Wellington city. A group of AmBUSadors will also start appearing at transport hubs across the region, offering a personal touch to information and advice on the changes.

“Getting to know what these changes mean for you means you’ll be ready well ahead of the changeover date and know about any timetable or route changes that affect you, and you’ll get the best value from day one because you’ll have your Snapper card organised.

“Because there are so many changes, some may take a while to bed down and there may be a few sticking points along the way. For some, the changes may take a bit of getting used to and we ask you to bear with us,” says Councillor Donaldson.

“It’s been a long time coming and I know the change is going to be worth it. Our new network is based on talking to customers around the region, as well as taking the best public transport ideas from around the world. That means Greater Wellington will continue to be the public transport leader in New Zealand, and our network well placed to support the region’s growth.”

ENDS

Major changes planned from 15 July are:

- New bus and railway timetables across the region.

- A zone based fare system across bus and rail that will allow more flexibility in travel.

- An average 3% increase to standard fares on trains and buses.

- A range of changed bus routes in Wellington, including new high capacity, high frequency routes, leading to a reduction in bus numbers travelling along Wellington’s Golden Mile.

- Snapper will be accepted on all Metlink buses and is the best value way to pay. Cash fares will be at least 25% more.

- Mana/Newlands and Uzabus payment cards will be retired. Free Snapper replacement cards will be available at a range of locations from Johnsonville to Otaki before 15 July.

- A range of discounts and concessions for off peak fares, children, people with disabilities, and tertiary students.

- Free transfers between any Metlink bus in the same zone within 30 minutes when using Snapper. Free transfers between trains and buses from Zones 4 to 14 with a MonthlyPlus pass (starts with August passes).

- By early 2019 all buses will be Metlink branded and painted lime and yellow. About 80% of the fleet will be purpose built low emission buses, including new double deckers and electric buses.

- All new buses will have bike racks. All Metlink buses will have racks from early 2019.

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