Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 

Correct spelling of Ōpōtiki

At a recent meeting of the Ōpōtiki District Council [subs Tuesday 5 June], Council voted to start the process to correct the official spelling of the District name through Land Information New Zealand, ensuring the inclusion of the macrons in Ōpōtiki.

Council is currently carrying out a Rapid Numbering and Road Renaming project to ensure the correct numbering and naming of all addresses and roads in the district. As part of that process, it has become apparent that the name ‘Ōpōtiki’ is misspelled in the Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) database as there are no macrons in the name.

Macrons are the small dash above a vowel showing a longer vowel sound. They are crucial in Te Reo as they tell you how to pronounce a word and are crucial to a word’s meaning.

Ōpōtiki Councillor, Arihia Tuoro explained the importance of starting the process of correcting the spelling and the flow on effects.

“Around the community, we already use macrons in the name Ōpōtiki – it is our tikanga, our place name, so there is no question that there should be macrons for it to make sense.

“Council has long used macrons in our signage and documents. Many other institutions around the district already use the macrons as well – schools, community groups and so on. By going through the official process, Council is formalising this use and recognising the importance of the macrons and our commitment to partnership with local iwi. It will provide a clear and consistent name and recognise the importance of Te Reo and tikanga, particularly in place names,” Ms Tuoro said.

As Council starts the process, there will be a formal consultation period for people to express their views through the New Zealand Geographic Board.

“It is also important to note that once it goes through the formal process, there won’t be a legal requirement for business and groups to change their name. They can use or not use macrons at their own discretion.

“As Council already uses the correct spelling in most signage, we don’t anticipate extra costs for ratepayers. But it would mean that other government agencies such as NZTA [New Zealand Transport Agency] would replace or alter signs as part of their normal renewal or damage replacement programme.

“For us, this is taking a formal step to ratify a name that is already in use in our community,” Ms Tuoro said.

Ends

Fun side quote: “When you take care to spell Māori words correctly and in a way that corresponds to the sound of te reo Māori it draws attention to the fact that the words are being treated as Māori words and that the language is valued,” says Lee Smith, kaitiaki reo ki Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori (The Māori Language Commission).


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

World Refugee Day: What 7 Former Refugee Kids Love About New Zealand

New Zealand resettles 1,000 refugees each year (a number set to increase to 1,500 by 2020). More than half of these people are children under 18.

RASNZ, a specialist mental health and wellbeing service provider for people from refugee backgrounds, wanted to know what some of these young people thought of their new lives as kiwis.

They asked 7 members of their specialist youth service (along with two staff members who work with refugee background youth) how they felt about New Zealand – and filmed the responses. More>>

 

DHBs: Nurses Plan Strike Action For Next Month

Nurses across the country have confirmed a notice of a 24-hour strike, starting on 5 July. District Health Boards (DHB) were working on contingency plans following a notice to strike by the New Zealand Nurses Organisation. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Tomorrow’s EU Trade Talks With NZ

One of the world’s most influential bureaucrats – the European Union’s Trade Commissioner Cecelia Malmstrom – will be in New Zealand tomorrow to launch the formal process of negotiating a bilateral trade pact between the EU and New Zealand. More>>

Oranga Tamariki: Children's Ministry Shifts Away From Putting Kids In Care

Children's Minister Tracey Martin is signalling a shift away from putting children into care, and towards intensive intervention in a child's home. More>>

But No Way To Tell Why: Significant Drop In HIV Diagnoses

A new report shows that for the first time since 2011, the number of annual HIV diagnoses in New Zealand has fallen. But without funding for a repeat of ongoing surveys to monitor changes in behaviour, testing and attitudes, health workers can’t be sure what’s driving the decrease. More>>

ALSO:

On Her Majesty's Public Service: Inquiry Into Spying Claims Extended To All Govt Agencies

In March, State Services Commissioner Peter Hughes announced an inquiry after it was revealed the firm spied on Canterbury earthquake claimants for Southern Response. The inquiry was furthered widened to include the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, who had been spying on Greenpeace staff. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On A New Obstacle To The 'Hit & Run' Inquiry

With a minimum of publicity, a High Court ruling hit the tarmac last week concerning the use of security information that – if left unchallenged – could well cripple the recently announced government investigation into the Hit & Run allegations. More>>

DHB Offer Rejected: NZNO Seeking Urgent Mediation

The latest revised DHB MECA offer has been strongly rejected by NZNO members. However, Industrial Services Manager Cee Payne says that as nursing and midwifery is an essential service, mediation or facilitation will begin with urgency. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages