Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 

Waka sculpture installation announced for Hamilton

MEDIA RELEASE

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2018

Waka sculpture installation announced for Hamilton’s Ferrybank Reserve

Artist’s impression of Tōia Mai, Hamilton’s new interactive waka sculpture by Wintec Media Arts Honours student Julian Smith.


The date is set for the installation of Hamilton’s newest public sculpture, Tōia Mai which tells the Matariki story and symbolises the cultural, spiritual and economic significance of the Waikato River.

Work has begun to install Tōia Mai, a 6.8m tall interactive sculpture, the result of the Matariki Interactive Waka Project led by artist and Wintec tutor Joe Citizen, before it is gifted to the people of Hamilton on 23 November 2018.

The project which Joe describes as “for the people, by the people” has been developed over the past 18 months. It is the result of collaborative partnerships between the artist, Wintec Māori Achievement team, Wintec staff and students, local industries, Hamilton City Council, researchers and mana whenua under the guidance of Wintec kaumātua Tame Pokaia.

“It has been a positive learning experience that has been at times testing and jubilant and I can’t believe we have finally got to this point” says Joe, now the first sods have been turned on the Ferrybank Reserve site.

This week, Wintec kaumātua Tame Pokaia gave the sculpture its name.

“The name, Tōia Mai refers to a call to action, pulling or working together with a unity of purpose. It highlights the many skills people bring to this project and will continue to do so, to preserve its longevity,” he says.

Wintec director Māori Hera White says the project has involved a large number of students studying Māori and Pasifika Trade Training (MPTT), IT, engineering, design and music alongside Joe Citizen, Wintec’s Māori Achievement team and industry partners.

“This project aligns with Wintec’s focus to encourage our students to be successful, through giving them real world experiences, cultural support and identity. It has also achieved results by ultilising their skills across a range of study disciplines,” says Hera.

“The learning for our students doesn’t stop when the sculpture is installed on its river site. Through a continued online presence and student-created phone apps, it will continue to enable future learning for students and the wider public alike.”

Striking a balancing between culture, history and technology, Tōia Mai is informed by an Internet of Things network aligned to the seven stars of Matariki, a taonga puoro informed soundtrack and interactive lighting which will respond to environmental, seasonal, and lunar changes, as well as people’s movements.

The sculpture is in its final stages of production with project partner, Longveld Ltd, a Hamilton engineering firm where a number of Wintec’s MPTT students have been mentored and guided.
Joe says that through this project, Longveld staff have encouraged students to develop their understanding of te ao Māori values, while also providing real-world experience and industry-ready skills.

Mentorship and in-kind support have been provided by project partners Longveld and Hamilton City Council and supporters ACLX, Aware Group, and Mech Eng Ltd, with additional sponsorship and grants received from the Brain Perry Charitable Trust, Trust Waikato, WEL Energy Trust, AUT University, DV Bryant Trust, and Creative New Zealand. Further student mentorship for the taonga puoro informed sound-tracks is provided by renowned Māori music practitioner Horomona Horo.

Tōia Mai will be officially gifted to the people at a public event on the afternoon of Friday 23 November on the Ferrybank Reserve, Hamilton.

About the sculpture
Tōia Mai is made from corten plate steel and features niho taniwha a Waikato pattern and reference to a proverb describing the many chiefs and villages along the Waikato River and a taniko pattern taken from the kaitaka or fine cloak belonging to King Tāwhiao*. While the sculpture has been built using modern materials and technology it was inspired by the story of Te Winika, the last surviving waka from the 1860’s land wars and what it represents as an icon of cultural and historical significance for the Waikato river and its people.

*King Tāwhiao was the second Māori King, leader and a religious visionary. He was a member of the Ngāti Mahuta iwi of Waikato.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Legal Issues: Gordon Campbell On The Commerce Commission Fuel Report

Yesterday’s interim Commerce Commission report on the fuel industry will do nothing to endear the major oil companies to the New Zealand public.

Apoparently, the fuel industry is an oligopoly where the Big Three (BP, Mobil and Z) that import 90% of this country’s fuel also control the supply, pricing, profit margins etc etc, from wharf to petrol pump, thereby all but throttling genuine competition at every stage along the way. More>>

 

Emergency Govt Bill: Overriding Local Licensing For The Rugby

“It’s pretty clear some clubs are having difficulty persuading their district licensing committees to grant a special licence to extend their hours for this obviously special event, and so it makes sense for Parliament to allow clubs to meet a community desire." More>>

ALSO:

Leaving Contract Early: KiwiBuild Programme Losing Another Top Boss

Ms O'Sullivan began a six-month contract as head of KiwiBuild Commercial in February, but the Housing Ministry has confirmed she has resigned and will depart a month early to take up a new job. More>>

ALSO:

Proposed National Policy Statement: Helping Our Cities Grow Up And Out

“We need a new approach to planning that allows our cities to grow up, especially in city centres and around transport connections. We also have to allow cities to expand in a way that protects our special heritage areas, the natural environment and highly productive land." More>>

ALSO:

Ombudsman's Report: Ngāpuhi Elder 'Shocked' By Conditions At Ngawha Prison

A prominent Ngāpuhi elder is shocked to find inmates at Ngawha Prison are denied water and forced to relieve themselves in the exercise yard... Chief Ombudsman Peter Boshier has released a report highly critical of conditions at the Northland prison. More>>

ALSO:

Promises: Independent Election Policy Costing Unit A Step Closer

The creation of an entity to provide political parties with independent and non-partisan policy costings is a step closer today, according to Finance Minister Grant Robertson and Associate Finance Minister James Shaw. More>>

ALSO:

School's In: Primary And Intermediate Principals Accept New Offer

Primary and intermediate school principals have voted to accept a new settlement from the Ministry of Education, which includes entrenched pay parity with secondary principals. More>>

ALSO:

IPCA On 'Rawshark' Investigation: Multiple Police Failings In Hager Searches Confirmed

The Independent Police Conduct Authority has found that the Police's unlawful search of Nicky Hager's property in October 2014 resulted from an unwitting neglect of duty and did not amount to misconduct by any individual officer... More>>

ALSO:

Broadcasting Standards: Decisions On Coverage Of Mosque Attacks

The Authority upheld one of these complaints, finding that the use of extensive excerpts from the alleged attacker’s livestream video on Sky News New Zealand had the potential to cause significant distress to audiences in New Zealand, and particularly to the family and friends of victims, and the wider Muslim community. More>>

PM's Post-Cab: Bad Mail

Cabinet was updated on the process around prisoners sending mail, following the accused Christchurch gunman sending letters that "should have been stopped". All mail of "high concern prisoners" will now be checked by a specialist team and a changes to the legal criteria for witholding mail are expecting to go to a cabinet committee in this parliamentary session. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels