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Ministers open Manawa, healthcare training facility

Minister for Health Dr David Clark and Minister for Education Chris Hipkins jointly opened Manawa health research and education facility, in Te Papa Hauora |The Christchurch Health Precinct today.

A collaborative partnership between Canterbury’s health and education sectors, Manawa brings together Ara Institute of Canterbury’s nursing, midwifery and medical imaging programmes, Canterbury District Health Board’s (CDHB) professional development training and University of Canterbury’s (UC) health research in one state-of-the-art facility.

“This is a significant milestone for Canterbury, and a new commitment to working together to achieve the best outcomes for the future of the health workforce in Canterbury,” Ara Chief Executive Tony Gray said. “Ara has enjoyed a close collaboration with Canterbury DHB for many years and, together with UC as well, now we are creating an exemplar in collaborative and co-located training and professional development.”

Canterbury DHB Chief Executive David Meates said: “Manawa is a fantastic opportunity for the Canterbury Health System to build on our foundation of innovation and integration recognised globally, to create and shape our future health and research workforce. Students, clinicians and researchers are ideally placed in this new setting to learn from, and alongside each other and together solve some of the significant challenges facing health and disability services.”

Professor Gail Gillon, Director of the Child Well-being Research Institute at University of Canterbury said: “UC’s partnership with Canterbury DHB and Ara in the Manawa building is an exciting opportunity for staff and students. They now benefit from connecting with health leaders, influencers and peers by being part of the Health Precinct, and the new research and development opportunities will expand our students’ experience.”



Dr Clark also officially opened the adjacent Christchurch Outpatients building.

Manawa’s simulation floor features realistic operating theatres, hospital wards, home environments and clinics that are used for training tomorrow’s workforce.

Manawa means heart, patience and breath and was bestowed on the facility, along with designs of cultural significance, by Te Pākura Ltd and local iwi.

Manawa also refers to the proverb “Manawa Whenua, Manawa Tangata”, which makes the intimate connection between human health and the health of our environment.

Cultural elements feature throughout Manawa. The principal design throughout the facility is the pūhoro pattern, relating to water. Weaving itself through the pūhoro pattern is aka-kiore (native jasmine), and on every floor is a depiction of a native bird.

The vision for a world class Health Precinct next to Christchurch Hospital emerged in the Blueprint for the City, following the 2011 earthquakes. Manawa is a flagship facility of this precinct - a creative and inspiring hub that integrates world-class healthcare, research and innovation, education and industry.

The facility was blessed in a cultural ceremony prior to occupation in July 2018.

Minister for Health Dr David Clark and Minister for Education Chris Hipkins jointly opened Manawa health research and education facility, in Te Papa Hauora |The Christchurch Health Precinct today.

A collaborative partnership between Canterbury’s health and education sectors, Manawa brings together Ara Institute of Canterbury’s nursing, midwifery and medical imaging programmes, Canterbury District Health Board’s (CDHB) professional development training and University of Canterbury’s (UC) health research in one state-of-the-art facility.

“This is a significant milestone for Canterbury, and a new commitment to working together to achieve the best outcomes for the future of the health workforce in Canterbury,” Ara Chief Executive Tony Gray said. “Ara has enjoyed a close collaboration with Canterbury DHB for many years and, together with UC as well, now we are creating an exemplar in collaborative and co-located training and professional development.”

Canterbury DHB Chief Executive David Meates said: “Manawa is a fantastic opportunity for the Canterbury Health System to build on our foundation of innovation and integration recognised globally, to create and shape our future health and research workforce. Students, clinicians and researchers are ideally placed in this new setting to learn from, and alongside each other and together solve some of the significant challenges facing health and disability services.”

Professor Gail Gillon, Director of the Child Well-being Research Institute at University of Canterbury said: “UC’s partnership with Canterbury DHB and Ara in the Manawa building is an exciting opportunity for staff and students. They now benefit from connecting with health leaders, influencers and peers by being part of the Health Precinct, and the new research and development opportunities will expand our students’ experience.”

Dr Clark also officially opened the adjacent Christchurch Outpatients building.

Manawa’s simulation floor features realistic operating theatres, hospital wards, home environments and clinics that are used for training tomorrow’s workforce.

Manawa means heart, patience and breath and was bestowed on the facility, along with designs of cultural significance, by Te Pākura Ltd and local iwi.

Manawa also refers to the proverb “Manawa Whenua, Manawa Tangata”, which makes the intimate connection between human health and the health of our environment.

Cultural elements feature throughout Manawa. The principal design throughout the facility is the pūhoro pattern, relating to water. Weaving itself through the pūhoro pattern is aka-kiore (native jasmine), and on every floor is a depiction of a native bird.

The vision for a world class Health Precinct next to Christchurch Hospital emerged in the Blueprint for the City, following the 2011 earthquakes. Manawa is a flagship facility of this precinct - a creative and inspiring hub that integrates world-class healthcare, research and innovation, education and industry.

The facility was blessed in a cultural ceremony prior to occupation in July 2018.


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