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‘Post No Bills’ with www.eBill.co.nz

For immediate release 10 April 2000

‘Post No Bills’ with www.eBill.co.nz

Post No Bills. That’s the message from New Zealand Post as it announced today that TrustPower customers and Hutt City Council ratepayers can now receive, pay and file their bills online using www.eBill.co.nz, New Zealand’s leading online bill payment service.

Vodafone New Zealand customers will be able to use the service in May and eBill will also be linked from WestpacTrust’s online banking site when it is launched at the end of April.

They join existing billers, Bank of New Zealand Credit Cards – Global Plus, MasterCard and Visa – Contact Energy and Saturn Communications whose customers already enjoy online bill payment with eBill.

“Post No Bills is probably the last thing you would expect to hear from New Zealand Post. It’s a statement that directly challenges the way people think about New Zealand Post and the way they traditionally receive and pay their bills,” James Grassick, New Zealand Post Agency Business Leader, said today.

“For New Zealand Post, eBill is a natural extension of the wide range of bill payment and delivery services that we already offer to our customers.

“Over 2,500 users have already registered with eBill, and as interest in online billing increases, we expect more billers and customers to come on board.”

Today, New Zealand Post launches a marketing campaign for eBill which includes online advertising, press ads, billboards and posters in downtown Auckland, Tauranga, Wellington and Christchurch, as well as a banner across New Zealand Post House in Wellington.

eBill is free for consumers. With eBill, consumers can receive and pay their bills from any computer connected to the Internet. Usage shows that most people use eBill between midday and 4.00pm, and between 8.00pm and 10.00pm.

Registered users are automatically notified by e-mail when their bills arrive. When logged-on, they see full-colour bills, complete with graphics, logos and billing details. They can use multiple bank accounts from any New Zealand retail trading bank to pay their bills and choose when to pay and the amount of each payment.

Security is a key feature. eBill uses 128 bit SSL encryption, the industry standard for financial transactions, and is backed by New Zealand Post’s reputation for trust and independence.

eBill was developed in association with CheckFree Corporation, the leading provider of online bill payment services in the United States, and was successfully trialled in June 1999 among 200 employees of New Zealand Post, Bank of New Zealand and Saturn Communications.

For further information, contact:
Simon Taylor, New Zealand Post Media Relations Manager
04-496-4015 or 025-248-6715

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