Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

No such thing as a 'win-win' negotiation

One of the biggest myths of the negotiation process is the 'win - win' outcome, according to visiting Australian expert, Associate Professor John Onto.

In New Zealand recently to present to the Victoria University Graduate School Master of Business Administration programme, Associate Professor Onto believes there is always give and take in any negotiation.

"Win-win is the biggest myth, implying each party get all they ask for...this doesn't exist. But winning negotiations is not a myth," he says.

The successful negotiating model that he promotes is one where everyone leaves the table feeling they got the best deal they could have.

"If you can get all that you thought you could possibly get, then that's a winning negotiation," he says.

Onto believes the sense of winning comes from the way the process is managed, "as distinct from what you actually get."

He argues that negotiation is a skill and a core management competency that can be learned.

"People who are good at negotiating can be better, and people who are bad can become reasonable at it," he says.

Negotiation has an identifiable process and predictable phases with key factors central to its success.

"Preparation - you can always get some information and understanding of the other party's needs and why they are bothering to talk to you," he says.

"Most people are negotiating with you because they can either hurt or help you. It is important to establish which camp you and the other party is in.

"Furthermore you should establish what you will give up in order to get what you want."



Onto says most people don't enjoy negotiation because, by definition, it involves conflict.

"The tension of conflict deters some people," he says.

"Often you don't know you're in a negotiation until it is too late and the process takes control of you, rather than the reverse."

But this links back to the preparation phase. "By preparing properly you can deal with the conflict phase."

Onto says negotiation is constantly around us - like it or not.

"We all do it, even without realising it. From the moment we get up we're negotiating, for example who goes first in the shower, or whose turn it is to put the cat out.

"If we all learn how to negotiate, people will be able to have more effective relationships with each other."

Onto's interest in negotiation followed a transaction at a Mexican street stall where he was buying a cheap necklace.

Thinking later about the process that had taken place, he realised negotiation was applied human behaviour producing a particular outcome.

Since then he has been teaching and consulting in the field of negotiation strategies, skills and processes for 20 years. In addition to extensive experience working with industry in Australia he has taught on executive programmes in the USA, Caribbean, Europe and Mexico.

Before taking his present position at Melbourne Business School, he was Associate Dean for Graduate Studies at Georgetown University School of Business (Washington DC).

Associate Professor Onto will be returning to Victoria University's Graduate School on 21 September to deliver a one-day winning negotiations seminar. This seminar is aimed at executives in the public and private sectors.

For further information about this seminar, contact Pat Cumming, Executive Programmes Coordinator, ph: (04) 463 5450 or email pat.cumming@vuw.ac.nz

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Electricity Market: Power Panel Favours Scrapping Low-Fixed Charges

An independent panel reviewing electricity prices favours scrapping the government’s low-user fixed charge regime, banning the use of prompt-payment discounts, and requiring greater disclosure of the profit split between the retail and generation arms of the major power companies. More>>

ALSO:

Bottomless Oil And Zero Climate Cost: Greenpeace Not Big On PEPANZ Gas Ban Report

The NZIER report commissioned by oil industry body, PEPANZ, claims the oil and gas ban issued by the Government last April could cost the the New Zealand economy $28 billion by 2050... But Greenpeace says the figures in the report are based on false assumptions and alternative facts. More>>

ALSO:

Two Queensland Fruit Flies And A Different One In Otara: Devonport Fruit And Veg Lockdown

Work continues at pace on the biosecurity response following the discovery last week of one male Queensland fruit fly in a surveillance trap in the Auckland suburb of Devonport. More>>

ALSO:

Digital Services Tax: Government To Plan Tax On Web Operator Income

New Zealand is to consult on the design of changes to tax rules which currently allow multinational companies in the digital services field to do business here without paying income tax. More>>

ALSO: