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IT Skills Prominent Among Migrants Seeking Work

More than 120 Information Technology professionals have registered with the “newkiwis” scheme in its first seven weeks of operation. The initiative was set up by the Auckland Chamber of Commerce to assist skilled migrants into productive employment.

Chief Executive Michael Barnett says that it is a paradox that employers are claiming a shortage of skilled workers exists while, at the same time, a large number of recent migrants with strong IT skills are having difficulty finding suitable work.

“We obviously have a wasted resource.” said Mr Barnett. Traditionally, employers cite the lack of English skills, little or no New Zealand work experience and limited local network as reasons for not hiring newcomers.

“However, IT qualifications tend to be global and generic. Employers wanting to recruit staff to exploit opportunities in the IT market are, I suggest, bypassing a potential goldmine by ignoring the contribution that new migrants bring.” said Mr Barnett.

Employers and migrants can register directly on-line at www.newkiwis.co.nz or by contacting project manager Leah Gates on Email: lgates@chamber.co.nz or phone (09) 309 6100.

The newkiwis employment programme is funded by the New Zealand Immigration Service and implemented by the Auckland Regional Chamber of Commerce.

Ends


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