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Networking Guru Drops In…

Dr. Ivan Misner, Founder & CEO of BNI or Business Network International, is visiting New Zealand next week. BNI, which was founded in 1985, has approximately 2,000 chapters throughout North America, Europe, Australia, Asia and Africa.

Last year alone, BNI generated over 1.7 million referrals resulting in over $US604 million dollars worth of business for its members.

In New Zealand, there are now 30 Chapters with over 600 members. Twenty-two of these chapters are in the Auckland region.

Dr. Misner's Ph.D. is from the University of Southern California. He has written five books, including his New York Times best seller Masters of Networking. He is on the Board of Directors for the Colorado School of Professional Psychology and is also on the faculty of Business at the University of La Verne.

Called the "Networking Guru" by Entrepreneur magazine, Dr. Misner is a keynote speaker for major corporations and associations throughout the world. He has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, L.A. Times, N.Y. Times, CEO Magazine and numerous TV and radio shows including CNBC and the BBC in London. In addition, Dr. Misner has twice been nominated for Inc. Magazine's "Entrepreneur of the Year Award."

During his New Zealand visit, Dr Misner will address seminars for Executive Events in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch. He will also be the Guest speaker at Auckland Rotary Club on Monday 13th August, West Auckland Rotary Clubs the following day and a major Founder’s Luncheon for BNI members in Auckland on Friday 17th August at the Centra (now Crowne Plaza) Hotel.

NZ Success Business Network International (BNI) is now the leading business referral organisation in New Zealand.

“Word of Mouth” is the most cost effective form of advertising there is and we have put in place a program based around what people have been doing informally ever since business began,” said Graham Southwell, National Director, BNI New Zealand.

Mr Southwell added that one of the things which makes BNI unique, is that it only allows one person from each trade or profession to join a chapter, which means your competitors cannot join and any conflict in passing referrals is avoided.

Almost any trade or profession can benefit from membership of BNI. Members range from funeral directors to balloon sculptors, and from mortgage brokers to electricians.

“Just imagine having 25 – 30 additional people on your sales force. That’s what membership of a networking group means – every chapter member carries your business card in a special BNI wallet and is constantly seeking opportunities for fellow members - you are doing the same thing for them,” said Mr Southwell.

Motivation Success in a networking group is in the hands of each member. They can get as much out of it as they put in. The added bonus is the group of motivated people encouraging individual members to achieve greater things, both personally and in business.

Mr Southwell said at about a dollar a day, membership of BNI makes good commercial sense, especially compared to the cost of advertising in such places as commercial directories.

“New groups are being formed all the time to meet demand and already there is a substantial waiting list of business people anxious to join a BNI Chapter as soon as a position becomes available.”

Detailed information about BNI can be found on its website – www.bni.co.nz

***


BNI (Business Network International) is a business and professional referral organisation whose primary purpose is to exchange qualified business referrals and develop word of mouth marketing techniques.

BNI has become the world’s largest business referral organisation of its kind.

In New Zealand, there are now 30 Chapters in Auckland, Hamilton, Tauranga, Wellington and Christchurch, with over 600 members.

Issued on behalf of BNI New Zealand by

CORPORATE FOCUS (Tony Benner)

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