Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Black Widow Spider Found, No Fumigation Failure

16 October 2001

Black widow spider found, no fumigation failures found

A live black widow spider was found last week in a carton of Californian table grapes in an Auckland supermarket.

Imports from the treatment facility in California were suspended until the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) audit was completed.

The USDA audit confirmed that all required treatments were carried out in California in accordance with agreed MAF standards. Importing has resumed.

“The USDA audit did not find any system failures which could be attributed to our standards not being followed correctly, therefore imports of Californian table grapes will continue,” said Justin Downs, MAF’s national adviser, International Operations (Plant Imports).

Mr Downs said the situation would be reviewed again if another exotic spider made it into New Zealand.

The USDA has written to MAF reassuring the Ministry of its, and the Californian table grape industry’s, commitment to comply with New Zealand import standards. Additional measures have also been put in place to ensure this remains a credible and sustainable program.

The risk of black widow spiders becoming established in New Zealand by this pathway is considered very low.

The male black widow spider has an elongated black shiny body, with white and red markings on its side. The female’s abdomen has a red hourglass mark or two red marks on its back. It is similar in appearance to the New Zealand katipo spider, which is venomous. The black widow spider’s bite is also venomous, and may result in breathing difficulties, nausea and vomiting.

New Zealand imports 400,000 cartons of Californian table grapes a year. So far this season 145,000 cartons have been imported. This equates to 3.625 million bunches of grapes. Last months finding of a black widow spider bring the total to three spider finds this season.

For further information contact Gita Parsot, MAF Biosecurity Communications on 04-470-2753


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

ScoopPro: Helping The Education Sector Get More Out Of Scoop

The ScoopPro professional license includes a suite of useful information tools for professional users of Scoop including some specifically for those in the education sector to make your Scoop experience better. More>>

Big Tax Bill Due: Destiny Church Charities Deregistered

The independent Charities Registration Board has decided to remove Destiny International Trust and Te Hahi o Nga Matamua Holdings Limited from the Charities Register on 20 December 2017 because of the charities’ persistent failure to meet their annual return obligations. More>>

57 Million Users' Data: Uber Breach "Utterly Preventatable"

Cybersecurity leader Centrify says the Uber data breach of 57 million customer and driver records - which the ride-hailing company hid for more than a year - was “utterly preventable”. More>>

Scoop 3.0: How You Can Help Scoop’s Evolution

We have big plans for 2018 as we look to expand our public interest journalism coverage, upgrade our publishing infrastructure and offer even more valuable business tools to commercial users of Scoop. More>>

Having A Cow? Dairy Product Prices Slide For Fourth Straight Auction

Dairy product prices fell at the Global Dairy Trade auction, retreating for the fourth straight auction amid signs of increased production... Whole milk powder fell 2.7 percent to US$2,778 a tonne. More>>

ALSO:

Statistics: Butter At Record $5.67/Block; High Vegetable Prices

Rising dairy prices have pushed food prices up 2.7 percent in the year to October 2017, Stats NZ said today. This followed a 3.0 percent increase in the year to September 2017. More>>

ALSO:

Science: New Research Finds Herbicides Cause Antibiotic Resistance

New University of Canterbury research confirms that the active ingredients of the commonly used herbicides, RoundUp, Kamba and 2,4-D (glyphosate, dicamba and 2,4-D, respectively), each alone cause antibiotic resistance at concentrations well below label application rates. More>>

ALSO: