Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Socio-economic Differentials in Fertility

Socio-economic Differentials in Fertility

Statistics New Zealand has just released a research report entitled 'Socio-economic Factors and the Fertility of New Zealand Women'. Using the 1996 Census data on children ever born to New Zealand women of all ages, it shows selected differences in childbearing behaviour, which enable an understanding of past, present and future population dynamics.

Many factors affect fertility levels. Past studies, both here and overseas, have found a direct correlation between fertility and education, income, religion, labour force status and marital status. However, latest findings based on the experiences of New Zealand women show that some factors have a smaller effect than expected. For example, the age at which women start childbearing does not correlate directly with the number of children they eventually give birth to. Nor does religion rank as a significant factor.

Similarly, while marital status is now partly incidental to fertility, work experience and the availability of employment are much more significant. The benefits of careers and the material advantages these give to women are important drivers in their decisions to bear children and in the development of social mechanisms to ensure their well-being. The causal link between education and fertility is also strong. Education not only provides women with independent access to information which they may otherwise be excluded from, it also provides access to a wider range of occupational opportunities. This may take the form of a career in the workforce, around which a family needs to be planned.

The report also discusses the revival of childlessness, which covers both involuntary and deliberate infertility. Cohort data indicates a marked decline in the proportion of women remaining childfree for cohorts born between 1900 and 1940, and an increase in childlessness among more recent birth cohorts. Among those aged 35-39 years in 1996, about 16 per cent (or one in six) had had no children.

This research report is the first of three companion studies on fertility differentials in New Zealand. It is to be followed by a detailed analysis of the relationship between ethnicity and fertility, while the third study will consider the spatial differentials.

This report is available on the Statistics New Zealand website (www.stats.govt.nz). See Socio-economic Factors and the Fertility of New Zealand Women.

Brian Pink Government Statistician END


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Income Equality: Time To Double-Down On Cutting CEO Salaries

With reports of a slow-down in CEO pay rises last year, it’s time for Kiwi corporates to double down on cutting excessive salaries to ensure this is a trend not an accident, said Peter Malcolm, spokesperson for the income equality project Closing the Gap. More>>

Manawatu-Whanganui Projects: PGF Top-Up To Rural Broadband Roll-Out

The government has effectively raided the $3 billion Provincial Growth Fund to top up the budget for the second phase of its rural broadband initiative, filling in mobile 'black spots' and ensuring broadband is available to marae that don't have access now. More>>

ALSO:

Other Windy Cities: Auckland-Chicago Named A Top 10 ‘Most Exciting’ New Route

The inclusion of Auckland-Chicago on Lonely Planet’s Where to fly in 2019? The 10 most exciting new flight routes list comes just two weeks before Air New Zealand prepares to celebrate its inaugural flight to Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport on 30 November. More>>

Deadly Strain: ESR Ups Its Reporting On Meningococcal Disease

The increasing number of cases of Group W Meningococcal disease (MenW) has prompted ESR to increase its reporting on the disease to the Ministry of Health. ESR has upped its reporting to weekly. More>>

ALSO: