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Pacific Peoples Summary Disability Survey Snapshot

New Zealand Disability Survey Snapshot 3

Pacific Peoples Summary

- One in seven Pacific peoples has a disability.

- Pacific boys (0 to 14 years) are more likely to have a disability than Pacific girls.

- Over half of all disabled Pacific peoples have more than one disability.

- Physical disabilities are the most common type of disability reported by Pacific peoples.

- Disease or illness is the most common cause of disability for Pacific peoples.

- Pacific adults with disabilities are less likely to be in the labour force than Pacific adults without disabilities.

1. Who has a disability?

Overall, an estimated 28,100 Pacific peoples reported having a disability in 2001. This means 1 in 7 Pacific peoples has a disability. The disability rate for all New Zealanders is 1 in 5. Pacific boys (0 to 14 years) are more likely to have a disability than Pacific girls. Ten percent of Pacific boys (0 to 14 years) reported having a disability, compared with 6 percent of Pacific girls in the same age group. There were no statistically significant differences between the disability rates for Pacific men and women in the older age groups.

Disability increases with age. Eight percent of Pacific children (0 to 14 years) reported a disability, compared with 12 percent of Pacific peoples aged 15 to 44 years and 26 percent of Pacific peoples aged 45 to 64 years. More than half (53 percent) of Pacific peoples aged 65 and over reported having a disability.

Fifty-three percent of disabled Pacific adults were partnered, which is on par with the proportion of all Pacific adults who were partnered (57 percent).

2. What type of disabilities do Pacific peoples have?

Over half (53 percent) of all disabled Pacific peoples reported having more than one disability. Physical disabilities were the most common type of disability reported by Pacific peoples. Fifty-six percent reported having a physical disability (15,600). 'Other' disabilities were the next most common type, affecting 42 percent (nearly 12,000). 'Other' disabilities included speaking, learning and remembering disabilities as well as chronic health problems (children only) and disabilities requiring the use of technical equipment (children only).

The most common cause of disability was a disease or illness, reported by 11,600 disabled Pacific peoples (41 percent). The next most common cause was an accident or injury, reported by 23 percent (6,500) of disabled Pacific peoples.

3. How are the lives of Pacific peoples with disabilities affected?

The numbers in this section refer to Pacific peoples living in households. Pacific adults with disabilities were less likely to be in the labour force than Pacific adults without disabilities. Forty-four percent of disabled Pacific adults were in the labour force, compared with 68 percent of Pacific adults without disabilities. People are considered to be in the labour force if they are either 'employed' or 'unemployed and actively seeking work'.

Disabled Pacific adults were also less likely to be employed than Pacific adults without disabilities. Thirty-four percent of all disabled Pacific adults who specified their labour force status were employed (7,400). This compares with 59 percent of non-disabled Pacific adults (just over 61,000).

Seventeen percent of disabled Pacific adults reported an unmet need for some type of health service (3,800). This is on par with the proportion of Pacific children who reported an unmet need for some type of heath service (16 percent or 900).

Thirteen percent of disabled Pacific adults (2,800) reported an unmet need for some type of special equipment related to their disability.

More information

This is the third in a series of nine snapshots presenting a selection of findings from the 2001 New Zealand Disability Survey. The survey provides an overview of disability in New Zealand. It covers people living in households and residential care facilities. The results are comparable with those from the 1996–1997 Disability Survey.


The next snapshot, "New Zealand Disability Survey Snaphot 4: People in Residential Care", will be published on 5 June 2002. A technical report containing information about how the survey was conducted, and tables from the 1996–1997 and 2001 surveys, will be published on 30 May 2002. The technical report from the 1996–1997 survey, "Disability Counts", is available free on the Statistics New Zealand website: www.stats.govt.nz.

Brian Pink

Government Statistician

END


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