Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


South Island's First Wind Power Flows

South Island's First Wind Power Flows

With the press of a switch, the Minister of Energy, Pete Hodgson, today sent electricity from the South Island's first wind generator into the national grid.

Earlier he donned white overalls and an appropriate red safety helmet before climbing 30 m inside the Windflow 500 tower to wave from a window in the nacelle to watching crowds. As he did so the turbine was buffeted by a cool north-east wind on its hill site off Gebbies Pass Road, south of Teddington, on Banks Peninsula.

Mr Hodgson was accompanied on the climb by Geoff Henderson, the Executive Director of Windflow Technology Ltd, who has promoted wind power for Canterbury for the past 10 years. The wind turbine has been made in New Zealand and uses several new technologies, such as the torque-limiting gearbox and the pitch-regulated two-bladed teetering rotor.

The wind turbine has a maximum output of 500 kW and an average of 200 kW, enough to serve 200 Christchurch houses. The Christchurch City Council has contracted to take all the power generated. The council's energy manager, Dr Leonid Itskovich, said the wind turbine could supply more than 3 per cent of the council's own power needs.

Mr Hodgson said that the commissioning of the wind turbine was "a point in history for wind generation." He said the turbine had come about because of the tenacity of Mr Henderson who had a "raging enthusiasm" for wind generation.

Mr Hodgson also praised Orion Ltd, the City Council, and the leadership of the company's late chairman, Dr Neil Cherry. There had been amazing support in the Canterbury region for the project and Mr Hodgson added that it seemed likely more turbines would follow.

The problem of distributed generation throughout the country had to be tackled and this would be done by regulation as he could not get agreement, he said.

"The future for New Zealand power generation will nearly all be renewably generated and a fair chunk of it will be wind. Hundreds of megawatts will be generated by wind over the next decades," Mr Hodgson said.

The chairman of Windflow Technology Ltd, Barrie Leay, said the second stage of the company's development would be to make money out of wind turbines. The company would increase production and "get its marketing right."

He said five projects were being developed in Canterbury at present and two were in the pipeline. He hoped the province would become the centre of excellence in the wind power industry.

Co-leader of the Green Party, Rod Donald, said he looked forward to the engineering expertise used in the Canterbury turbine being exported. He said the harnessing of the wind in the province was a tribute to Dr Cherry.


With the press of a switch, the Minister of Energy, Pete Hodgson, today sent electricity from the South Island's first wind generator into the national grid.

Earlier he donned white overalls and an appropriate red safety helmet before climbing 30 m inside the Windflow 500 tower to wave from a window in the nacelle to watching crowds. As he did so the turbine was buffeted by a cool north-east wind on its hill site off Gebbies Pass Road, south of Teddington, on Banks Peninsula.

Mr Hodgson was accompanied on the climb by Geoff Henderson, the Executive Director of Windflow Technology Ltd, who has promoted wind power for Canterbury for the past 10 years. The wind turbine has been made in New Zealand and uses several new technologies, such as the torque-limiting gearbox and the pitch-regulated two-bladed teetering rotor.

The wind turbine has a maximum output of 500 kW and an average of 200 kW, enough to serve 200 Christchurch houses. The Christchurch City Council has contracted to take all the power generated. The council's energy manager, Dr Leonid Itskovich, said the wind turbine could supply more than 3 per cent of the council's own power needs.

Mr Hodgson said that the commissioning of the wind turbine was "a point in history for wind generation." He said the turbine had come about because of the tenacity of Mr Henderson who had a "raging enthusiasm" for wind generation.

Mr Hodgson also praised Orion Ltd, the City Council, and the leadership of the company's late chairman, Dr Neil Cherry. There had been amazing support in the Canterbury region for the project and Mr Hodgson added that it seemed likely more turbines would follow.

The problem of distributed generation throughout the country had to be tackled and this would be done by regulation as he could not get agreement, he said.

"The future for New Zealand power generation will nearly all be renewably generated and a fair chunk of it will be wind. Hundreds of megawatts will be generated by wind over the next decades," Mr Hodgson said.

The chairman of Windflow Technology Ltd, Barrie Leay, said the second stage of the company's development would be to make money out of wind turbines. The company would increase production and "get its marketing right."

He said five projects were being developed in Canterbury at present and two were in the pipeline. He hoped the province would become the centre of excellence in the wind power industry.

Co-leader of the Green Party, Rod Donald, said he looked forward to the engineering expertise used in the Canterbury turbine being exported. He said the harnessing of the wind in the province was a tribute to Dr Cherry.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

I Sing The Highway Electric: Charge Net NZ To Connect New Zealand

BMW is turning Middle Earth electric after today announcing a substantial contribution to the charging network Charge Net NZ. This landmark partnership will enable Kiwis to drive their electric vehicles (EVs) right across New Zealand through the installation of a fast charging highway stretching from Kaitaia to Invercargill. More>>

ALSO:

Watch This Space: Mahia Rocket Lab Launch Site Officially Opened

Economic Development Minster Steven Joyce today opened New Zealand’s first orbital launch site, Rocket Lab Launch Complex 1, on the Mahia Peninsula on the North Island’s east coast. More>>

Earlier:

Marketing Rocks!
Ig Nobel Award Winners Assess The Personality Of Rocks

A Massey University marketing lecturer has received the 2016 Ig Nobel Prize for economics for a research project that asked university students to describe the “brand personalities” of three rocks. More>>

ALSO:

Nurofen Promotion: Reckitt Benckiser To Plead Guilty To Misleading Ads

Reckitt Benckiser (New Zealand) intends to plead guilty to charges of misleading consumers over the way it promoted a range of Nurofen products, the Commerce Commission says. More>>

ALSO:

Half A Billion Accounts, Including Xtra: Yahoo Confirms Huge Data Breach

The account information may have included names, email addresses, telephone numbers, dates of birth, hashed passwords (the vast majority with bcrypt) and, in some cases, encrypted or unencrypted security questions and answers. More>>

ALSO:

Rural Branches: Westpac To Close 19 Branches, ANZ Looks At 7

Westpac confirms it will close nineteen branches across the country; ANZ closes its Ngaruawahia branch and is consulting on plans to close six more branches; The bank workers union says many of its members are nervous about their futures and asking ... More>>

Interest Rates: RBNZ's Wheeler Keeps OCR At 2%

Reserve Bank governor Graeme Wheeler kept the official cash rate at 2 percent and said more easing will be needed to get inflation back within the target band. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news