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NZ's First Dual RW Compatible Home DVD Recorder

Sony launches New Zealand's First Dual RW Compatible Home DVD Recorder

AUCKLAND, 4 September, 2003 - New Zealanders will now be able to record their own DVDs thanks to the launch of Sony's home DVD recorder. The RDR-GX7 offers consumers the best in recording and playback compatibility and as such is considered an industry first.

"Just imagine, thanks to our new Sony DVD recorder you can share the special moments in your life with family and friends in impressive DVD picture quality at the touch of a button. Not only is the recorder compatible with a variety of formats but it is also user-friendly and has a stylish design," says Erin May, Senior Product Manager, Consumer Visual Products Group, Sony New Zealand Limited.

The RDR-GX7 has sophisticated camcorder control capabilities that offer a variety of editing features including One Touch Dubbing, which makes the archiving of personal home movies on DVD simple and fun. It is easy to use thanks to a user-friendly Graphic User Interface (GUI), and the model's recording and playback quality is comparable with Sony's high-end DVD-Video players.

The DVD recorder also has a stylish design that blends with the Sony family of wide screen televisions and home entertainment systems.

Dual RW Compatible

The RDR-GX7 is the only home DVD recorder that currently supports the recording of DVD-RW, DVD+RW and DVD-R formats, thus eliminating the need for consumers to choose one format over another and ensuring the best possible playback compatibility. This unique format freedom gives the user more choice of media and greater compatibility among home entertainment hardware.

The new model also incorporates several picture improvement technologies to create enhanced DVD recordings, especially effective when transferring content from video sources such as VHS or 8mm camcorders.

Intelligent Camcorder Control

When a DV or Digital8 camcorder is connected to the RDR-GX7 via Sony's single cable

i.LINK (DV) interface all camcorder dubbing and editing functions are controlled by the DVD recorder using an intuitive and interactive operating system. 'Best in category' dubbing capabilities enable users to transfer the entire or selected contents of a tape to a disc easily.

One Touch Dubbing facilitates easy tape to disc conversion by pressing one button. Program Edit and Advanced Program Edit present more flexible editing functions such as eliminating unnecessary scenes. With these controls, users can structure their discs as they wish, benefiting from the highest quality recorded image.

Impressive Picture Quality

The playback capability of the RDR-GX7 is comparable with high-end Sony DVD-Video players such as the DVP-S9000ES, thanks to the use of a 12bit/108MHz video D/A converter with Noise Shaped Video technology and Motion Adaptive Field Noise Reduction. Input pre-processing such as pre Frame Noise Reduction and pre Video Equalizer could improve the picture quality by removing noise, even when archived analogue source material is used. Also VBR (Variable Bit Rate) recording for all formats optimises picture quality especially for longer recording time periods.

Ease of Use

A major feature of the RDR-GX7 is its highly developed user interactivity, with Sony making several advances in the man-machine interface. Using a distinctive on-screen GUI users breeze through personal DVD title creation employing a sophisticated remote commander to control the recorder. The GUI blends in to any living room environment and enables users to concentrate on operating the recorder. It is possible to create a title list of up to 99 programs with thumbnail pictures, extracting TV program title names direct from the Teletext service when they are available.

Sophisticated Design A sophisticated slim line design and brushed aluminium front panel add to the aesthetic appeal of this recorder. Despite its advanced functionality, the RDR-GX7 sports highly compact dimensions that fit neatly under a TV and matches the colour scheme and design concept for a wide range of Sony home theatre products. The RDR-GX7 is available in Sony Style showrooms and authorized Sony Retailers from early September 2003.

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