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Plan For A Holiday Break – Not Break-In

11 December 2003
Media release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Plan For A Holiday Break – Not Break-In

Amidst the enthusiasm that we all feel as our Christmas holidays approach it is all too easy to overlook the important matter of the security of our homes while we are away.

The New Zealand Security Association warns however, that it is during the holidays, that our homes and valuable possessions are more likely to be targeted by burglars. History shows that many people return home after a well-earned holiday to find that their house has been burgled.

The NZSA advises that there are many common sense things that can be done to avoid your home being targeted by burglars such as having someone clear your mail, putting lights and appliances on a timer and having a neighbour park their car in your drive or put their washing on your line to give the appearance that the house is occupied.

One of the better measures that can be taken is to have a security alarm system installed. Scott Carter, chairman of the NZSA, says when that alarm is being installed, it makes sense to have smoke detectors put in at the same time.

“We recommend the alarm system is both installed and monitored by businesses who are members of the NZSA, as they should be trained and accredited professionals.” Mr Carter says.

“Having the security alarm system monitored gives you the comfort of knowing that there will always be a professional response to any extraordinary activity on your alarm system.

For even greater peace of mind, the NZSA recommends using a security patrol service.

“Their key role is the prevention or detection of unlawful or unauthorised entry on to premises and the prevention and or detection of offences,” Mr Carter says.

The NZSA says security officers must be creditworthy and without criminal Background and all officers must receive adequate and regular training, including related law, practical arrest and search, evidence, fire prevention, first aid, and co-operation with law enforcement agencies.

They must hold a security licence, wear a readily identifiable uniform bearing insignia that will identify the officer with his employer and indicating that he/she is a security officer and vehicles must be similarly identified.

“Most patrol work is for commercial premises outside normal working hours; however, an increasing number of residential suburbs or communities are engaging professional security firms to patrol their streets,” Mr Carter says.

“Most businesses, and now many home owners, are arranging additional security checks by these professional security firms over the holiday period.”

For more information and an NZSA buyers guide check out www.security.org.nz

…ends/

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