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Commission Appoints New Chief Executive

Media Release 26 March 2004

Commission Appoints New Chief Executive

Mr Peter Douglas (Ngati Maniapoto) has been appointed the new chief executive officer to lead a post-allocation Te Ohu Kai Moana.

Currently the principal Maori adviser at the Ministry of Social Development, Mr Douglas will take over from the current CEO Robin Hapi, who has been appointed the inaugural CEO of Aotearoa Fisheries Limited (AFL).

Under the Commission’s proposals for allocation before Parliament, the existing Fisheries Commission is split into two distinct entities – the new Te Ohu Kai Moana, as the successor to the Commission, and AFL, a commercial enterprise that will provide a vehicle for Maori to leverage presence and influence within the fishing industry.

The deputy chairman of the Commission and member of the Appointments Panel, Craig Ellison, said today that the new CEO’s appointment was critical to the successful allocation and future protection of the Maori Commercial Fisheries Settlement.

“The new Te Ohu Kai Moana will primarily be responsible to Iwi and the wider Maori community, but will also need to manage successful relations with the Crown in the future as we work to protect the value and integrity of the settlement. Peter has an excellent understanding of Maori issues, strong reporting and advisory capabilities, and experience in policy development in Government at the highest levels.

“The Commission believes Mr Douglas has the insight and ability to manage the new strategic direction of Te Ohu Kai Moana into the future for the benefit of all Maori,” Mr Ellison said.

Mr Douglas has worked in the both the public and private sectors including his current position at the Social Development Ministry, General Manager Maori Strategy at the Department of Child Youth and Family and a Senior Manager in business banking at Westpac Bank.

He was an adviser in the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet from 1990 to 1995, including during the time of the 1992 Fisheries Settlement. He holds a Bachelors degree in social science from Waikato University and a Masters degree in Public Administration from Harvard University in the United States.

Mr Douglas has been the chairman since 1997,of the Ruapuha Uekaha Hapu Trust, which is the principal owner of the Glow Worm Caves, in Waitomo. He has lectured in business studies at Te Wananga o Raukawa from 1996 – 2000.

ENDS

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