Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Trans-Tasman Forest Industries Strengthen Ties

Trans-Tasman Forest Industries Strengthen Ties

The New Zealand and Australian forest, wood, and paper products industries are moving towards a closer working relationship at a series of industry meetings to be held in Canberra between 16 and 24 April.

Chief Executive of the New Zealand Forest Industries Council, Stephen Jacobi, welcomed the move towards greater co-operation between the two countries.

“Just like our two economies under CER, forest industries on both sides of the Tasman are increasingly integrated with one another: we share a common resource based on radiata pine and we are chasing essentially the same markets. The fact is the challenges we face are bigger than just one industry and bigger than just one country,” said Mr Jacobi.

The round of meetings includes the inaugural meeting of the Trans-Tasman Forest and Wood Products Forum. Taking place on 20 April, the forum is a joint initiative between the new Australian plantation industry organisation, A3P, and the New Zealand Forest Industries Council.

CEOs and senior managers from New Zealand companies Carter Holt Harvey, Crown Forestry, Forest Research, Tenon, Weyerhaeuser, Winstone Pulp and from the New Zealand Forest Owners Association and New Zealand Pine Manufacturers Association are attending the forum. “Forestry is New Zealand’s third largest export sector and it makes sense to work co-operatively with our nearest neighbour on large strategic issues affecting both countries, such as international trade, research and development, and climate change,” said Mr Jacobi.

“Deepening our dialogue with the Australian industry on international trade issues is particularly important. As international markets are freed up by the slow but sure process of the World Trade Organisation, and as the pace of international competition quickens, we must position ourselves more aggressively. That means, inevitably, doing more together.”


Mr Jacobi will also be meeting with global forest, wood, and paper industry leaders while in Canberra. On 15-16 April he will attend a meeting of the International Council of Forest and Paper Associations (ICFPA) and on 17 April he will chair a gathering of industry leaders from Australia, Canada, Chile, South Africa, and the United States to review the progress of WTO Doha negotiations.

“Representatives of these industries first met in Oaxaca, Mexico, in May 2003 to discuss the progress in the Doha negotiations and to consider options to further the interests of the global industry in these critical negotiations,” said Mr Jacobi.

Mr Jacobi said the Doha negotiations offer an unparalled opportunity to eliminate trade barriers, put in place more effective trade rules, and address the specific concerns of developing countries.

“There has been a sense of drift in the negotiations for much of this year. But now that they are moving again the industry is keen to press for a robust outcome through substantial tariff reductions, the elimination of non-tariff barriers, and the creation of more effective trade rules.”

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Sky City : Auckland Convention Centre Cost Jumps By A Fifth

SkyCity Entertainment Group, the casino and hotel operator, is in talks with the government on how to fund the increased cost of as much as $130 million to build an international convention centre in downtown Auckland, with further gambling concessions ruled out. The Auckland-based company has increased its estimate to build the centre to between $470 million and $530 million as the construction boom across the country drives up building costs and design changes add to the bill.
More>>

ALSO:

RMTU: Mediation Between Lyttelton Port And Union Fails

The Rail and Maritime Union (RMTU) has opted to continue its overtime ban indefinitely after mediation with the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) failed to progress collective bargaining. More>>

Earlier:

Science Policy: Callaghan, NSC Funding Knocked In Submissions

Callaghan Innovation, which was last year allocated a budget of $566 million over four years to dish out research and development grants, and the National Science Challenges attracted criticism in submissions on the government’s draft national statement of science investment, with science funding largely seen as too fragmented. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Spark, Voda And Telstra To Lay New Trans-Tasman Cable

Spark New Zealand and Vodafone, New Zealand’s two dominant telecommunications providers, in partnership with Australian provider Telstra, will spend US$70 million building a trans-Tasman submarine cable to bolster broadband traffic between the neighbouring countries and the rest of the world. More>>

ALSO:

More:

Statistics: Current Account Deficit Widens

New Zealand's annual current account deficit was $6.1 billion (2.6 percent of GDP) for the year ended September 2014. This compares with a deficit of $5.8 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) for the year ended June 2014. More>>

ALSO:

Still In The Red: NZ Govt Shunts Out Surplus To 2016

The New Zealand government has pushed out its targeted return to surplus for a year as falling dairy prices and a low inflation environment has kept a lid on its rising tax take, but is still dangling a possible tax cut in 2017, the next election year and promising to try and achieve the surplus pledge on which it campaigned for election in September. More>>

ALSO:

Job Insecurity: Time For Jobs That Count In The Meat Industry

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, Meat Workers Union National Secretary. “Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news