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Up Front The NZSA e-Newsletter May 2004


Up Front The NZSA e-Newsletter May 2004

Vol 3 No#4

A SPOT OF TRIVIA

In years past, spermaceti oil - from the sperm whale - was used as transmission oil in Rolls-Royce automobiles. CONFERENCE REMINDER Conference is next month! 10/11 June 2004 Duxton Hotel, Wellington Click here to register

Index

1. 21 Days To Go! Early Bird Conference registration closes in just one week

2. Conference Sponsors are Key to Success In this edition, we feature the third of the three Principal Sponsors of the 2004 Security Conference - TSSL (Training Systems and Solutions Limited).

3. New Zealand Fire Service The New Zealand Fire Service have concerns about the number of unwanted false alarms that they receive from private monitoring companies - have your say!

4. ASIS Auckland Branch Meeting Special presentation on the Madrid train bombing to be made on Friday 28 May 2004.

5. ASIAL Security 2004 ASIAL, our Australian counterparts, are holding their security conference on 14-15 July in Sydney.

6. Regional Updates What is happening in your region

7. NZSA Website Check us out!

8. New Zealand Property Institute Keep informed of programmes organised by the NZPI.

9. Yellow Pages Link Yourself 21 Days to Go!

Bookings for this year's Conference are steady. However, have YOU booked yet? The early bird registration closes in just one week. It is only every three years that the Conference is held in Wellington, so here is the chance to mix and mingle with a greater number of users of security services than normal.

Don't forget, you can register from the website.

Back to index Sponsors are the Key to Conference Success

This year is the first time we have had an industry training company as a Principal Sponsor:

TSSL (Training Systems and Solutions Ltd) are New Zealand’s leading provider of workplace security training. Their core business is the design, development, management, and delivery of high quality competency-based learning and assessment programmes. Their main focus is on programmes that enable participants to gain New Zealand national qualifications and unit standard credits. Their special areas of expertise are in security, personal safety, counter terrorism, first-line management and supervision, occupational safety and health, conflict resolution, calming and restraint, critical incident management, and related competencies.

Back to Index New Zealand Fire Service

On 24th February 2004 members of the NZSA sub committee for alarm monitoring met with senior members of the New Zealand Fire Service – Auckland Fire Region to continue discussions regarding concerns that the New Zealand Fire Service have about the number of unwanted false alarms that they receive from private monitoring companies.

Although as an industry, we have differing opinions to the New Zealand Fire Service on some of the matters that were discussed; we do share their desire to find a solution to this on going issue and to that end an invitation was extended for the New Zealand Fire Service to state their position to the security industry in order to prompt debate that would lead to a way forward.

Below is a letter and a position paper from the New Zealand Fire Service, if you would like to contribute any comments toward this issue, please forward them to info@security.org.nz and the NZSA will ensure that your thoughts on this issue receive representation.

20 April 2004

Executive Director

New Zealand Security Association

PO Box 3-3936

Takapuna

Auckland 1309

Attention: Barrie Cooper

Dear Sir

REDUCING UNWANTED FALSE ALARM CALLS TO SMOKE ALARMS CONNECTED TO PRIVATELY MONITORED SECURITY SYSTEMS

The New Zealand Fire Service continues to be very concerned about the number of unwanted false alarms that are received from private monitoring companies. We do not have a false alarm problem from non-connected domestic smoke alarms, albeit that many occupants often do.

These calls rapidly increased in the first six months of 2001, the call rate of false alarms received to privately monitored fire alarm systems more than doubled, from 172 in January to 368 in June. The number peaked in July 2002 at 1260 fire alarms. The start of the increasing call rate was about the same time as aggressive promotions began encouraging people to have a smoke alarm fitted onto their monitored residential security alarm system.

The first of several joint meetings to find ways to reduce these calls was held with your association and other interested parties in July 2001. We have had several meetings since, but have not been able to agree to a way forward.

I attach a position paper about smoke alarms and smoke detectors connected to privately monitored security systems. Also attached is the latest graph of calls received from private monitoring companies. It should be noted that historically calls have increased over winter, peaking in July.

We implore your Association to take a lead and encourage the use of smarter systems, better technology, training, certification of trained installers, and better procedures in your industry to reduce the impact on unwanted false alarms on the Fire Service and your customers.

The Fire Service has some options to enable us to reduce these unwanted false alarms. Earlier this year the government announced a comprehensive review of the Fire Service Act. We could consider that we recover costs from the monitoring company that forwards us unwanted false alarms, which is done in Australia. Currently the Fire Service Act enable us to recover costs from building owners, and as you are aware, we actively recover costs from commercial building owners after unwanted false alarms.

If you have any comment on any part of this letter or position paper, please contact either Gavin Parish or myself. Your comments and assistance will be appreciated.

Yours faithfully

Cliff Mears

Assistant Fire Region Commander

Auckland Fire Region

NEW ZEALAND FIRE SERVICE POSITION PAPER

REDUCING UNWANTED FALSE ALARM CALLS

SMOKE ALARMS/DETECTORS CONNECTED TO PRIVATELY MONITORED SECURITY SYSTEMS 1. Introduction

Smoke alarms/detectors are for the protection of life, rather than property. They are highly prone to false alarm, especially in residential dwellings.

They are for early warning, to notify the occupants of an early stage fire, so they can investigate or get out.

Having smoke alarms/detectors monitored does not greatly aid life safety because the response time is usually longer than the time for fire to become deadly.

Working smoke alarms/detectors are a final line of defence, and are not totally fail safe. Fire safety education, awareness, and good fire safe practices are essential. 2. Background

The New Zealand Fire Service has responded to an increasing number of ‘111’ telephone calls received from private monitoring centres over the last three years. The majority of these ‘111’ calls were to smoke alarm activations, where the smoke alarms are connected to monitored security systems located in residential dwellings.

Approximately 98% of all the ‘111’ calls received are unwanted false alarms mainly caused by steam from showers and fumes/smoke from cooking.

Most ‘111’ calls to false activations of monitored smoke alarms in residential dwellings are single events only, that is often no repeat false alarm calls to the same premises within same year period, therefore no warning letters are sent to property owners.

3. Motivation for reducing unwanted alarms

§ Consequences of unwanted alarms for the building occupant are:

It unnecessarily disrupts the occupants, and has a cost to commercial business

It erodes confidence in the reliability of the smoke alarm

it leads to complacency

It leads to the possible disabling of the system to prevent further unwanted false alarms

§ For the Fire Service they are:

resources are committed that might be needed for a genuine emergency

f volunteers are called out there is the cost to their employers or themselves if self employed

it reduces the time available to crews for delivering fire safety and education

there are increased running costs

there is the potential for accidents from fire appliances responding to the false alarm

4. New Zealand Building Code

Clause F7 of the Building Code, issued by the BIA [Building Industry Authority], came into force on 24 April 2003. This requires all new domestic dwellings [household units], and dwellings that undergo alterations and thus requires a building consent by the Territorial Authority, to have appropriate means of detection and warning of fire provided within each household unit.

§ This amendment requires that all smoke alarms being installed have a ‘hush’ button.

§ Monitoring of the smoke alarm is not required.

5. Standards

Smoke alarms shall be listed or approved by a recognised authority as complying with one of the following standards; UL217, ULC S531, AS3786, BS5446 Part 1.

Systems should comply with NZS 4514:2002, Interconnected smoke alarms for single household units.

Smoke detection component of the security system should be installed to a recognised standard.

Systems should be independently certified and maintained [to NZS4512, NZS4514, or a Code Of Practice developed by the NZSA].

Smoke alarms connected to security systems connected to security systems should be installed and maintained in accordance with a recognised standard such as BS5839, AS1670.6 or other relevant standard acceptable to the Security Industry.

Smoke detector systems installed in commercial premises should be installed to NZS4512 [refer section 10]

6. Definitions

Smoke alarms – are installed in household units [refer NZS4514:2002]

Is a device containing a smoke detector and an alarm sounding device

Multiple station smoke alarm has interconnection with other units for common alarm communication

Single station smoke alarms are not intended to be interconnected with other units

Smoke detectors – are typically installed in commercial premises [refer NZS4512:2003]

s a device containing a smoke detector and may have a separate alarm sounding device

Is interconnected with other units and is generally connected to a monitoring centre

Ionisation type responds to the presence of gaseous or invisible products of combustion causing a change in ionisation currents within the detector

Photo-electric type responds to the scattering or adsorption of light by suspended particles

See selection and location of fire detectors in NZS4512 and NZS4514

7. Installation of smoke alarms/detectors

The Fire Service actively promotes the installation of multiple mains powered interconnected smoke alarms/detectors in residential houses for the life safety of all occupants. They shall be interconnected so that activation of one detector initiates sounders that can be clearly heard above background noise in all rooms in which the alarms are installed. Minimum audibility of 75dba shall be provided at the bed head in each designated sleeping area.

To provide for adequate life safety smoke alarms/detectors shall be placed in all bedrooms and adjoining passageways/spaces and recommended for lounge/living areas [plan for worst case scenarios where people asleep in bed need to be woken on the outbreak of a fire]. Refer Approved Documents of the Building Code, Clause F7, Warning Systems [Third Edition]

‘Hush’ button smoke alarms should be fitted in areas where there is a greater risk of false alarms, such as in or near kitchens and bathrooms. As a general rule smoke alarms should not be fitted within 5m of a cooker, and 3m of a shower.

Smoke alarms shall be fit for the purpose and not false alarm from the normal use of the dwelling, eg cooking, showers [of an appropriate standard of manufacture, ionisation type, photoelectric type or a combination of both types].

Smoke alarms installed in or near kitchens should be photoelectric smoke alarms with hush button, rather than the standard ionisation smoke alarm.

8. If residential smoke alarms/detectors are monitored

Smoke alarms/detectors installed on any monitored system must have local sounders that alert the occupants whenever they operate.

The alert sound should be distinct and different from the security alarm sound so occupants know that it is a fire alarm activation.

Consider a minimum of two smoke alarms/detectors installed on a system operate before transmitting a call to the monitoring centre [‘double-knock’ principle].

Smoke alarms/detectors should not be connected to the 24 hours circuit of the security system.

If domestic smoke alarms/detectors are connected to a private monitoring company, they should only be ‘live’ to the monitoring company when the security system is set, that is when the occupants are not at home. They should only be monitored when the occupants are not at home.

The private monitoring company must phone the occupants on every occasion the smoke alarm/detector activates, to check whether the alarm is a genuine activation, not an unwanted alarm, before calling the Fire Service.

Smoke detection components on security alarms should be installed by trained, certified contractors.

The monitoring company must insist that the occupant complies with having the required servicing and maintenance contracts carried out regularly.

The general standard of installations needs to be vastly improved.

The monitoring company, as well as the installation company, must advise the customer that the Fire Service can charge the owner for false alarms when the customer requests the monitoring company to call the Fire Service after any activation. [Note section 11] 9. For existing installations on security systems – residential dwellings

With agreed lead-in time security systems with smoke alarm/s attached should be reprogrammed so as to be local sounding only, and not call the security monitoring centre when the dwelling is occupied.

Smoke alarms shall be fit for the purpose and not false alarm [of an appropriate standard of manufacture, ionisation type, photoelectric type or a combination of both types to suit the particular environment in which they are installed].

Where necessary relocate or replace existing smoke alarms.

Ensure adequate audibility of smoke alarms/detectors.

Encourage additional smoke alarms for full coverage of sleeping areas and escape routes.

Educate/inform all residential customers of the proposed changes.

The private monitoring company must phone the occupants on every occasion the smoke alarm/detector activates, to check whether the alarm is a genuine activation, not an unwanted alarm, before calling the Fire Service.

10. New security system installations – commercial premises

All installations of smoke detectors [not smoke detectors that are silent on activation] require a building consent in accordance with the Building Code. This is because they are a life safety system and will be required to be maintained as part of the Compliance Schedule and Warrant of Fitness of the building, and should comply with NZ4512.

Where a fire report or building consent calls up one of the acceptable solutions types 2, 3, 4, or 5, these must not be installed on a security system, as they will not comply with the Acceptable Solution of the Building Code. These systems must comply with NZS4512.

Smoke detectors should not be connected to the 24 hours circuit of the security system.

To provide for adequate property protection, smoke detectors should cover the complete fire cell or premises as required by NZS4512.

Where a smoke detector is installed, it shall not transmit a call other than to a remote monitoring centre. These alarms are property protection systems specifically to call a response when the building is unoccupied, and are often asked for by an insurance company.

Smoke alarms/detectors shall be fit for the purpose and not false alarm in the normal use of the premises eg manufacturing, cooking, showers. They shall be of an appropriate standard of manufacture, ionisation type, photoelectric type or a combination of both types.

Smoke detection components on a security system should be installed by trained, certified contractors.

The monitoring company must insist that the occupant complies with having the required servicing and maintenance contracts carried out regularly.

11. Charging for Fire Service attendance

Charging for false alarms has proven to be an integral component in the effort to reduce false alarms through the NZFS National False Alarm Reduction Strategy.

In the case of security monitored smoke alarms, where the remedial approach has not been successful, it is considered appropriate that the Fire Service charge for attendance at an unwanted false alarm.

If you would like to contribute any comments toward this issue, please forward them to info@security.org.nz and the NZSA will ensure that your thoughts on this issue receive representation.

Back to Index

ASIS Auckland Branch Meeting

Friday 28th May 2004- Auckland Club - 34 Shortland Street @ 7.30 am

SPECIAL PRESENTATION: MADRID TRAIN BOMBING - March 11th 2004

Spain suffered the worst terrorist attack in its history on March 11th 2004.

10 explosive devices detonated within 15 minutes on 4 trains carrying over 700 people each. Activation was by cell phone. The death toll was 191; injured and traumatized casualties were over 1,800.

Police found 2 other explosive devices later that had failed to explode.

Join us in this factual power point presentation provided to ASIS by the Joint EU/US Overseas Security Advisory Council.

Bring your peers, clients and business associates. Presentation starts at 7.45 am and will be completed by 8.30 am.

$20 per head includes breakfast.

RSVP to: barrie@security.org.nz

REMINDER OF NEXT MEETING: Friday, 25th June 2004

Contact : Charles Fraser AUCK Branch email: charlesf@asgl.co.nz Website: http://www.asis.org.nz

Back to Index ASIAL Security 2004

ASIAL, our Australian counterparts, are holding their security conference on 14-15 July in Sydney.

For more information, go to: http://www.asial.com.au/events/security/

Back to Index

Regional Updates

Northern Region

(Please note meetings are usually held on the last Tuesday of every second month.)

Mark your diaries now for the next meeting: When: Tuesday 29 June 2004 Where: The Horse and Trap, 3 Enfield Street, Mt Eden Admission: $5.00 Agenda: To be confirmed

For further information and to RSVP, contact Steve Minogue: steve.minogue@iag.co.nz

Central Region

Indicative dates for the remainder of 2004 are as follows: - Thursday 10 / Friday 11 June 2004 (National Conference, Wellington) - Wednesday 21 July 2004 (Branch Meeting) - Wednesday 15 September 2004 (Branch Meeting) - Wednesday 17 November 2004 (Branch Meeting - Year End)

Also, we are always on the lookout for meeting sponsors and guest speakers - so please do not hesitate to e-mail Rogan Maxwell with any details or suggestions.

For further information, contact Rogan Maxwell: maxwell@rexel.co.nz

Southern Region

Watch this space for details of further 2004 meetings.

For further information, contact Shaun Knapp: shaunk@actionalarms.co.nz

also:

NZISF (NZ Information Security Forum) Meetings These will be held every second Thursday of the month.

The NZISF cordially invites you and your friends to the next breakfast meeting: When: Thursday 11 June 2004 at 7.30 am Where: The Auckland Club, 34 Shortland Street, CBD, Auckland Admission: NZISF, NZSA and NZCS members and students - $20.00 All others - $25.00. Cash or cheque only please - no credit cards Registration: E-mail your name, first name, business affiliation, and phone number to: lech@auckland.ac.nz. You will receive confirmation via e-mail.

Topic:

To be Confirmed - Watch this space!

Back to Index NZSA Website

WEBSITE: www.security.org.nz If you require the access password to the Members Only section, please don't hesitate to call us and we will give it to you. This is for members only. Please keep this password information strictly confidential to NZSA members.

Your feedback on the website content will be welcomed and if you have any suggestions, please let us know.

Back to Index New Zealand Property Institute

For information on conferences, seminars and workshops facilitated by the New Zealand Property Institute, go to: http://www.property.org.nz/

ENDS

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