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Solar Water Heating Can Avoid Hot Water Cuts

June 2004

Solar Water Heating Can Avoid Hot Water Cuts

"Home owners are encouraged to install a solar water heating units so that they will have adequate hot water in the event of Transpower cutting electricity supplies" said the Chairman of the Solar Industries Association today. Mr Roy Netzer said that if home owners in the Christchurch and Malborough area installed a solar water heating unit now they would not only secure their hot water supply but also make a sound long term investment that grows with future electricity price rises.

Transpower have indicated that they may have to cut hot water heating in the event of transmission lines in the upper South Island not having capacity if lines get over loaded.

Mr Netzer said "Solar water heating is a good way of ensuring your family has a good hot water supply. If enough people installed them it would also help alleviate Transpower's capacity problem as total electricity demand would be reduced."

"The electricity suppliers are also continually increasing electricity prices and a solar hot water unit could cut about a third of your monthly electricity bill.'

"A number of hot water system suppliers are also offering finance assistance until the end of June so now is an appropriate time to purchase your system. The cost of a system should not be a barrier because of the finance arrangements available. These arrangements are only available now because of a specific Government funding programme."

Details on the Government arrangement are available on www.solarsmarter.org.nz

"The radiation levels during winter in the South Island are sufficient to heat water for domestic use. The most important factor is analysing you hot water needs, sizing and installing the system correctly. Sufficient panels surface; high pitch of the panels for the low sun during winter and a hot water cylinder with a recommended capacity of 1.5 times the daily water usage or larger are some of the main factors"

Mr Netzer said that people interested should approach accredited suppliers for a further information on the size of system that would suit their family. Each accredited supplier has a network of trained installers covering most areas.

ENDS


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