Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Stop Killing Our Bees

28 October 2004

Stop Killing Our Bees

Better communication among orchardists will help stop an epidemic of bee deaths in pip fruit areas of New Zealand, said Milton Jackson, Chairman of the New Zealand Bee Industry Group (NZBIG).

Mr Jackson said that hives are losing 60% to 80% of their field bees because some orchardists are not communicating to others that they have sprayed carbaryl insecticide on their trees.

Carbaryl is used to control codling moth and as a thinning agent for unwanted apples. It is illegal to use the spray on trees still in flower.

"The problem is of particular concern in the Hawke's Bay, Bay of Plenty and Nelson regions, the main pipfruit growing areas," Mr Jackson said. "Bees brought in to pollinate an unsprayed orchard often fly to neighbouring orchards which have recently been sprayed."

"Bee losses due to carbaryl poisoning have been a problem for many years, but it has affected hives more seriously this year. Hives have been weakened due to the varroa bee mite.

"Bees dying because a neighbour has sprayed trees is not only disheartening but can be the cause of unset or deformed fruit, meaning lower yields and less profit for orchardists.

"Orchardists must communicate with their neighbours -- he or she is only a phone call away. Unfortunately we can’t fence our bees in. They will fly up to three kilometres from the hive to find nectar.

"We have five commercial pollinators in Hawke's Bay and most are becoming disillusioned with the continued poisoning and at least two are thinking seriously of not pollinating next year. Bees are essential to horticulture. Fewer bees means less pollination and less fruit, sucking money out of the economy," Mr Jackson said.

The New Zealand Bee Industry Group is part of Federated Farmers of New Zealand (Inc).

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

ScoopPro: Helping The Education Sector Get More Out Of Scoop

The ScoopPro professional license includes a suite of useful information tools for professional users of Scoop including some specifically for those in the education sector to make your Scoop experience better. More>>

Big Tax Bill Due: Destiny Church Charities Deregistered

The independent Charities Registration Board has decided to remove Destiny International Trust and Te Hahi o Nga Matamua Holdings Limited from the Charities Register on 20 December 2017 because of the charities’ persistent failure to meet their annual return obligations. More>>

57 Million Users' Data: Uber Breach "Utterly Preventatable"

Cybersecurity leader Centrify says the Uber data breach of 57 million customer and driver records - which the ride-hailing company hid for more than a year - was “utterly preventable”. More>>

Scoop 3.0: How You Can Help Scoop’s Evolution

We have big plans for 2018 as we look to expand our public interest journalism coverage, upgrade our publishing infrastructure and offer even more valuable business tools to commercial users of Scoop. More>>

Having A Cow? Dairy Product Prices Slide For Fourth Straight Auction

Dairy product prices fell at the Global Dairy Trade auction, retreating for the fourth straight auction amid signs of increased production... Whole milk powder fell 2.7 percent to US$2,778 a tonne. More>>

ALSO:

Statistics: Butter At Record $5.67/Block; High Vegetable Prices

Rising dairy prices have pushed food prices up 2.7 percent in the year to October 2017, Stats NZ said today. This followed a 3.0 percent increase in the year to September 2017. More>>

ALSO:

Science: New Research Finds Herbicides Cause Antibiotic Resistance

New University of Canterbury research confirms that the active ingredients of the commonly used herbicides, RoundUp, Kamba and 2,4-D (glyphosate, dicamba and 2,4-D, respectively), each alone cause antibiotic resistance at concentrations well below label application rates. More>>

ALSO: