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Oranjeboom blasts onto premium beer marketplace

Oranjeboom blasts onto premium beer marketplace

From 1 July 2005 you will be able to get your hot little hands on Holland’s most distinguished pilsner beer: Oranjeboom, brewed and distributed by Lion Nathan.

Heralded as one of the finest examples of continental brewmanship, the original Oranjeboom is one of Europe’s principal pilsner beer brands.

Lion Nathan is delighted to announce it has secured both the brewing and distribution licence for New Zealand from the brewery, which will be done under strict supervision from InBev.

“We are proud to have Oranjeboom join our portfolio of premium international beers and we see this lager as an alternative drinking option for New Zealand’s discerning beer drinkers,” says Adrian Hirst, Oranjeboom Marketing Manager.

Oranjeboom is a 5% premium, golden-colour pilsner beer with fruity hop notes in the aroma, a crisp refreshing finish and a full, rich flavour.

“This is a lager with wide appeal – it’s perfect with a range of European dishes as well as with more traditional Kiwi cuisine,” says Adrian.

The original ‘Brouwerij de Oranjeboom’ was established in Holland in 1671. It’s striking crest and colour symbolises the family tree of the Dutch Royal Family, the princes of Oranje-Nassau. These elements were assigned to the brewery and its premium beer to pay homage to the royal founders of the Realm of Netherlands.

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With all the credentials of a royal heritage, Oranjeboom has a niche amongst quality products and taste profiles that are a perfect match for today’s more discerning beer drinker.

Launching into grocery and liquor stores nationwide from 1 July 2005, Oranjeboom will carry an everyday RRP of $19.99 per dozen. It is available in 330mL tall, emerald green, crown seal bottles in both six and 12 pack formats.

ENDS

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