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Reaching For The Skies


Reaching For The Skies

With the predicted shortage of people working in the New Zealand travel and tourism industry in the coming years, the country's largest private travel and tourism training provider has gained approval from NZQA to meet an area of acute demand.

In a Tourism Industry Association (TIA) report, entitled 'Tourism Workforce and Skill Projections,' one area highlighted is a substantial shortfall in the number of flight attendants needed in the industry by 2010.

Recognising this demand, Sir George Seymour National College of Tourism and Travel this week gained NZQA approval for its new 31-week Certificate in Travel & Tourism (Cabin Crew preparation), and will be taking on new students for the first courses commencing in August 2005.

Students will learn industry level skills for cabin crew cervice and in-flight safety procedures, first aid, self-defense skills and emergency evacuation procedures. In addition to the specific cabin crew preparation training, students will walk away with industry recognized and NZQA approved qualifications, such as the National Certificate in Tourism and Travel (Core Skills) Level 3, National Certificate in Travel Level 3 and National Certificate in Computing (Level 3).

Even before the course gained industry approval, Sir George Seymour College Business Development Manager Maria Scott said the college had been inundated with students and prospective students wanting to better their chances of selection by the airlines.

"We felt the need to then design a course that met airline standards and provided students with skills and tools that airlines look for when they recruit," she said.

"It will also provide students with a real taste of what a career as a flight attendant entails, that there is much more to it than the glamorous role it's perceived to be"

In addition, the 31-week Certificate in Travel & Tourism (Cabin Crew Preparation) will give students valuable industry skills that will set them up for a career in many other areas of travel and tourism such as airport authorities, hotels, tourist attractions and travel agencies, said Scott.

ENDS

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