Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

CallSouth Take On Telco Giants

CallSouth Take On Telco Giants

South Island based telecommunications company, CallSouth, is taking on the market giants with the launch of a full suite of landline services.

The Oamaru based company, which has been providing toll call and internet products to customers around the country for the past five years, now offers line rental and other line services traditionally dominated by the major telecommunications companies.

Chief executive Peter Roborgh says the launch represents an exciting move towards CallSouth securing a significant portion of the residential landline market and giving people more choice for their home phone services.

"We've launched this service as a result of demand from our existing toll call and internet customers who see benefits in a smaller more customer focused company meeting all their communications needs."

Mr Roborgh says CallSouth's products have so far been extremely well received, especially in the provincial areas.

"We recognise the importance of providing great service to provincial New Zealand and CallSouth has already developed a strong presence throughout the country."

"Our ability to provide the full range of line services – and save customers money in the process – greatly enhances our product offering and is a huge incentive for consumers to choose CallSouth over other telephone line companies," he says.

CallSouth line service charges are based around the principal 'the more you talk, the more you'll save on line rental' and are highly competitive when compared to other telephone line companies, according to Mr Roborgh.

Call South's line services include line rental, answer-phone, call-holding, fax switching, and caller-id.

100% Kiwi owned and run, CallSouth was set up in October 2000 to offer a choice of better value tolls and internet related services to New Zealanders.

CallSouth is also a corporate with a conscience. One per cent of each customer's toll charges are donated to local activities by a charity chosen by each customer, either IHC, St John, Heart Foundation or Surf Lifesaving.

For information about CallSouth or its products visit www.callsouth.co.nz or phone 0508 66 88 77.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Scoop 3.0: How You Can Help Scoop’s Evolution

We have big plans for 2018 as we look to expand our public interest journalism coverage, upgrade our publishing infrastructure and offer even more valuable business tools to commercial users of Scoop. More>>


Statistics: Butter At Record $5.67/Block; High Vegetable Prices

Rising dairy prices have pushed food prices up 2.7 percent in the year to October 2017, Stats NZ said today. This followed a 3.0 percent increase in the year to September 2017. More>>

ALSO:

Science: New Research Finds Herbicides Cause Antibiotic Resistance

New University of Canterbury research confirms that the active ingredients of the commonly used herbicides, RoundUp, Kamba and 2,4-D (glyphosate, dicamba and 2,4-D, respectively), each alone cause antibiotic resistance at concentrations well below label application rates. More>>

ALSO:

CO2 And Water: Fonterra's Environment Plans

Federated Farmers support Fonterra’s bold push to get to zero emissions of CO2 on the manufacturing side of the Co-operative, both in New Zealand and across its global network. More>>

ALSO:

Fisheries: Decision To Delay Monitoring ‘Fatally Flawed’

Conservation group representatives say a decision by the new Minister of Fisheries, Stuart Nash, to delay implementation of camera monitoring of fishing efforts in New Zealand is ‘fatally flawed’. More>>

ALSO:

Kaikōura Quakes: One Year On

State Highway One and the railway were blocked by damage and slips and the Inland Road suffered significant damage. Farms, homes and businesses suffered building and land damage. Power and internet went down, drinking water systems, sewage systems and local roads were all badly affected... More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Bill Bennett on Tech