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Shark Survival latest craze at Kelly Tarlton’s

For immediate release
September 19 2005

Shark Survival the latest craze at Kelly Tarlton’s
Thrill seekers can get into the tank with feared denizens of the deep

Swimming in shark infested waters is hardly the holiday experience most people would relish, but that’s exactly what Kelly Tarlton’s Antarctic Encounter and Underwater World is inviting thrill-seeking visitors to the popular Auckland waterfront attraction to do.

Kelly Tarlton’s, which is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, has just launched ‘Shark Survival’, an underwater encounter for visitors wanting to test their fear factor and get up close and personal with these creatures of the deep.

There has long been a fascination with sharks, says Kelly Tarlton’s Operations Manager, Andrew Baker.

“For Kiwis, this is fed by regular media reports of sightings both in our waters and Australia and, in part, it is this fascination that has prompted us to develop Shark Survival at Kelly Tarlton’s.”

He said by introducing the encounter, Kelly Tarlton’s also aimed to raise awareness of the need to protect sharks from extinction.

“Nearly 90% of predatory fish, including sharks, have disappeared from the world’s oceans since the1950s. If we’re not careful we could be the last generation of people to see sharks in their natural environment. We hope that our Shark Survival encounter will not only demystify sharks but also highlight some of the problems occurring in our oceans and ways we can help.”

Kelly Tarlton’s wants as many people as possible to experience the thrill of diving with sharks.

“We’ve designed Shark Survival so that anyone with an interest in the ocean can safely experience these creatures of the deep at close quarters – whether they are a certified diver, enthusiastic snorkeler or a complete novice,” adds Mr Baker.

The Shark Survival encounter, like Stingray Bay and the Stingray Splash experience, are all part of the extensive redevelopment project undertaken at Kelly Tarlton’s by owner, Tourism Holdings Limited, to ensure that the aquarium remains a world-class attraction.

Shark Survival at Kelly Tarlton’s is operated by Ocean Quest, which is owned and operated by Tim Ellett and Geoff Burne. Like Kelly Tarlton’s, they are keen for people to learn and understand more about the ocean environment that surrounds New Zealand and its fish inhabitants – even the scarier ones!

The experience is strictly limited to a maximum of four groups per day of up to three people per group. Qualified instructors accompany them. This ensures that there is a quality and safe experience for all – sharks included!

All equipment, including wetsuits, is provided. Shark Survival costs $210 for certified divers and $285 for non-divers. The certified diver programme runs from 2:00pm – 5:30pm and the non-diver programme runs from 10:30am – 5:30pm. Participants must be aged 15 years and over and should bring swimsuits and towels.

For further information, please visit www.kellytarltons.co.nz or call 0800 80 50 50.

ENDS

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