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Public Apology From Julian Wilcox

1 October 2005

Public Apology From Julian Wilcox

Broadcaster Julian Wilcox has tendered an apology to Maori Television and to the public for his actions surrounding a media story that brought disrepute to Maori Television.

Mr Wilcox was dismissed by Maori Television last week after Mr Wilcox contributed to providing information to other media, which led to negative stories being broadcast and published. It is accepted that he was not the originator of the leaked email; however Mr Wilcox accepts the seriousness of his actions.

Mr Wilcox made the following statement:

“I wish to offer my sincere apologies to the board, management and staff of Maori Television for my actions. I also offer my sincere apologies to the channel’s viewers and other supporters of Maori Television.

“I take full responsibility for the impact my actions have had on the kaupapa and people of Maori Television. I sincerely regret this.”

Mr Wilcox also said: “This issue was never about tikanga Maori. It was and has always been an employment related matter.

“I wish to thank those people who have supported me through this matter; however, I accept that I made mistakes and my actions were inappropriate, and I apologise for this.

“To work at Maori Television is a privilege, and I have been given another opportunity to work at this station. Maori Television is a taonga and I acknowledge the kaumatua who fought for thirty years for its development. I have a deep personal commitment to te reo Maori and I support the efforts and commitment of the board, management and staff to ensure the survival and revitalisation of te reo Maori.”

Maori Television Chief Executive Jim Mather said the issue had been a very sad one for everyone associated with Maori Television and also for Mr Wilcox’s whanau. He respected the maturity that Mr Wilcox has displayed in accepting responsibility for his actions, and said the taonga which is Maori Television was greater than any individual, regardless of their seniority or standing within the organisation.

Mr Mather said mediation with Mr Wilcox had been completed. Given the expression of deep remorse from Mr Wilcox and his full commitment to the kaupapa of Maori Television, Mr Wilcox will commence employment with Maori Television in January 2006.

ENDS

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