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Preparing business for a pandemic

Preparing business for a pandemic

We are all aware of the potential impact on individuals and communities of a flu pandemic, but so far little attention has been paid to the effects on businesses and other organisations.

At the very least, businesses are likely to find themselves coping with significant staff absences and disruption to their supply and distribution chains.

All businesses will feel the strain. Some are likely to go under. As always, the ones which emerge in best shape will be those who have taken the time to think through the risks and prepare for them in advance, before the panic sets in.

This is why New Zealand’s leading health and safety magazine, Safeguard, has organised a seminar to help businesses come to grips with the nature of the risks they face, and find out how to go about protecting themselves from the effects.

“There is no need to be alarmed, but there is a need to have thought about it before being overwhelmed by events,” says Safeguard editor Peter Bateman. “This is precisely the kind of low-risk/high-consequence scenario for which prudent business managers will be prepared.”

The seminar, scheduled for Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch, will outline the potential effects of a flu pandemic in terms of individual and public health.

Bell Gully partner Andrew Scott-Howman will discuss the legal ramifications in terms of health & safety and broader employment law, and the Ministry of Economic Development will outline key contingency planning measures which businesses can take now to ensure continuity during times of high staff absence, and of disruption to the supply and distribution chains.

Dr Teri Lillington, the Australia-based health advisor with Shell Oceania, will outline the extent of that company’s business continuity and risk management preparations for a pandemic.

There is no need for businesses to panic over the prospect of a flu pandemic, provided key people have assessed the risks and managed them. Safeguard’s seminar is designed to meet the information needs of HR, health & safety and other managers from business organisations of all kinds.


ENDS

Full information and registration at www.safeguard.co.nz

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