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Fonterra Invests in Dairy's Future Thinkers

6 September 2006

Fonterra Invests in Dairy's Future Thinkers

Fonterra is providing research grants to New Zealand university science and technology students to encourage them to undertake dairy-related research at PhD level.

The programme is offered in conjunction with either the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology's (FRST) Technology for Industry Fellowship or the Tertiary Education Commission's Enterprise Scholarship.

As the recipients of the Fonterra research grants, students receive guidance from a Fonterra-based academic mentor and a University-based supervisor and are required to give yearly presentations on their projects.

Seventeen of the dairy industry's youngest innovators presented their research at Fonterra's Hamilton office last week.

The students traveled from universities around New Zealand to give twenty minute seminars on a variety of topics in dairy technology, including the health benefits achieved by replacing sugar with honey in milk products, and potential ways to reduce energy consumption by maximising heat recovery in milk powder plants.

Fonterra's Senior Technologist for Funding and Development, Neil Walker stressed the importance investing in the development of dairy's future thinkers.

"Fonterra greatly values its association with PhD students of such high calibre." Mr Walker said. "These students make an important contribution to the development of leading edge technology that is necessary to ensure the success of the dairy industry in the international playing field."

"Fonterra's mission to Lead in Dairy means being the best in everything we do, at every step of the supply-chain. Continued innovation and a commitment to understanding the changing needs of our business and customers are crucial to keeping Fonterra at the forefront of the dairy industry and the New Zealand economy."

"It's top research like that being undertaken by these young people that is going to help us do that, while giving them an opportunity to grow academically and get some practical experience at the same time."

This is the seventh year Fonterra has funded the programme.

ENDS

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