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Splatz pack makes a splash

Splatz pack makes a splash

A brand new packaging technology licensed to Fonterra has arrived and New Zealanders are among the first in the world to experience it.

This week the CrushPak® innovation hit supermarket shelves in the form of Fresh ’n Fruity’s new Splatz range.

The packaging offers a revolutionary and easy way to eat yoghurt. The container is an accordion-like pack enabling the contents to be squeezed into your mouth eliminating the need for a spoon.

Fresh ‘n Fruity commissioned award-winning brand design agency Dow Design to bring the story to life. Director Annie Dow says it’s not just the packaging that’s unique but also the absence of chunky fruit bits.

“Research by Fresh ‘n Fruity revealed that five-to-12 year-olds dislike the fruity bits in their yoghurt – they’d rather have a smooth yoghurt experience.

“So the fruity bits came out but the fruit stayed in. And we’ve made it a big feature on the product packaging.”

The new look is playful and eclectic in style, says Dow.

“It's got energy and entertainment value. On each variant there is a mysterious unidentified character who uses creative means in a clever way to get the bits out.

“This will appeal to kids because we're not telling them the whole story. There's room for their own imaginations and that's engaging for young minds.”

Fresh ’n Fruity senior brand manager Anna Gresham, says Splatz is the result of tapping into global mega trends: the increase of snacking, on-the-go consumption and rising health awareness of obesity.

“The patented squeezy pots are fun & engaging for kids – and for mums it means no spoons are required. We feel confident kiwi kids and their parents will love it.

“The bright green pack has great standout on shelf and research showed the vibrancy of the pack appeals strongly to kids.”

Fresh ’n Fruity Splatz come in four flavours – two creamy; strawberry, vanilla and two sour; apple and lemon lime.


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