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Reduced Fuel Surcharge for Tickets Sold Outside NZ

16 October 2006

Singapore Airlines to Reduce Fuel Surcharges for Tickets Sold Outside New Zealand

Singapore Airlines will reduce its fuel surcharges for tickets sold outside New Zealand, following a decline in jet fuel prices over recent weeks.

When the surcharges were introduced, Singapore Airlines undertook to keep their application under ongoing review, and to make adjustments in response to sustained changes in the price of jet fuel. In recent weeks, the price of jet fuel has dropped, although the price is still substantially higher than when the decision to impose surcharges was first made.

Collections from fuel surcharges have only ever given partial relief from the cost increase as a result of the high price of jet fuel. Nevertheless, in keeping with the commitment to make adjustments, either up or down, in line with sustained movements in the price of jet fuel, the following surcharges will apply for tickets purchased on or after Saturday 14 October 2006:

- Between Singapore and gateways in South East Asia (ASEAN countries):
Reduce from USD20 to USD18 per sector

- Between Singapore and gateways in USA/Canada:
Reduce from USD90 to USD82 per sector

- For all other flights:
Reduce from USD60 to USD54 per sector

Singapore Airlines will continue to monitor the price of jet fuel and regularly review the level of the surcharge.

This change will not affect tickets sold in New Zealand. “Singapore Airlines New Zealand has for some time included the fuel surcharge within its pricing structure to ensure complete transparency to the consumer,” says Sak-Hin Chin, General Manger New Zealand. “We constantly review our pricing to ensure our competitiveness, and make price adjustments when necessary.”

ENDS

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