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Telecom Launches Its First Home Video Phone

Telecom Launches Its First Home Video Phone

The phone call becomes an even more personal way of connecting for New Zealanders with the launch today of Telecom’s new home video phone.

The Telecom Ojo Video Phone is a dedicated video phone for the home, and is the first of a new generation of communication and entertainment services using broadband that Telecom will be introducing.

Telecom General Manager of Consumer Marketing Kevin Bowler says the Telecom Ojo will offer Kiwis high-quality real-time video conversations with friends and family across the country and the world.

“The telephone call has always been a special thing for New Zealanders in helping to overcome distance between friends and family. Video is now also a big part of the way New Zealanders connect with others and share their lives both through home video, and online social networking.

“With the widespread uptake of broadband we can now add a face to face element to communications in easy, live video calling for the home.

The Telecom Ojo is the result of a partnership between Telecom and Philadelphia-based Worldgate. The partnership agreement means customers will purchase the Ojo phone from Telecom and WorldGate will provide the calling service.

Mr Bowler says the Telecom Ojo brings all the advantages of broadband to home calling.

“Ojo, like a regular home phone is always on, so there’s no need to organise with overseas callers a time to call each other. The conversation is in real time, smooth, and with a near TV broadcast-quality picture. It’ s as close to a face-to-face conversation as you can get without being there.”

He says Telecom expects the Ojo to appeal to New Zealanders who have friends and family living around the country and overseas. The phone can be used anywhere in the world and simply requires a standard fixed-line broadband connection, router and WorldGate subscription. Customers can then simple plug the phone and they’re ready to make calls.

Ojo Video Phone features
• Large 7 inch portrait screen, ergonomically-designed so callers can look directly at screen and camera
• No additional software required
• 30 frames/second video (MPEG-4; 30 frames-per-second), picture clarity close to broadcast quality
• Video Mail, callers can receive a pre-recorded video greeting when the person they’ve called is out
• Monthly service fee (US$14.95) allows customers to make as many calls as they like within the their allocated broadband allowance
• Photo caller ID
• Speakerphone to allow more than one person to be involved in either end of the call
• A single Ojo handset is $749.99 and $1399.99 for a twin pack

Ends

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