Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Warehouse #1 for Forest Friendly Outdoor Furniture

22 February 2008

MEDIA RELEASE

Greenpeace ranks The Warehouse #1 for Forest Friendly Outdoor Furniture

A Greenpeace survey of 19 New Zealand furniture retailers recommends The Warehouse as the best place to buy “forest friendly” outdoor furniture.

Greenpeace’s Good Wood Survey*, in conjunction with the Indonesian Human Rights Committee, questioned leading retailers on their procurement policies including issues such as timber certification, the use of kwila and their contribution to eliminating the sale of timber from illegal and unsustainable sources. The Warehouse came out on top and is described by Greenpeace as “leading the pack” in New Zealand with an overall B+ rating.

The Warehouse’s General Manager, Marketing, Stuart Yorston, says The Warehouse has always made the desirable affordable, but the definition of desirable is shifting as consumers become more environmentally and ethically aware.

“Some consumers now want to know more about the story behind our products before they make a buying decision. We’ve been working for about four years now to put sourcing and procurement policies in place that address our customers’ growing interest in the sustainability of our merchandise.”

All timber used in The Warehouse’s outdoor hardwood furniture ranges carries Forest Stewardship Council (FCS) certification or is linked to a Tropical Forest Trust (TFT), project which is progressing towards independently certified sustainable forest management.

The Warehouse’s Sustainability Manager, Trevor Johnston says, “Taking a strong ethical stand on tropical timbers was an obvious move for us because of the rapidly accelerating illegal felling of tropical forests and the harm this causes.

The Warehouse’s approach to ethical sourcing does not stop at the environment. Regular labour inspections are carried out at the Vietnamese factory supplying the hardwood furniture, as with all The Warehouse’s major suppliers throughout Asia. These inspections are an important part of The Warehouse’s drive to ensure that products are made in safe and healthy conditions, workers are properly paid and their rights respected, and factories work to reduce their impact on the environment.

ENDS

http://www.greenpeace.org/new-zealand/press/reports/outdoor-furniture-guide
http://www.thewarehouse.co.nz/rexcomposer/files_download.asp?id=100012340&x=1

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On Tiwai Point (And Saying “No” In Greece)

Its hard to see how Rio Tinto’s one month delay in announcing its intentions about the Tiwai Point aluminium smelter is a good sign for (a) the jobs of the workers affected or (b) for the New Zealand taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:

Half Empty: Dairy Product Prices Extend Slide To Six-Year Low

Dairy product prices continued their slide, paced by whole milk power, in the latest GlobalDairyTrade auction, weakening to the lowest level in six years. More>>

ALSO:

Copper Broadband: Regulator Set To Keep Chorus Pricing Largely Unchanged

The Commerce Commission looks likely to settle on a price close to its original decision on what telecommunications network operator Chorus can charge its customers, though it probably won’t backdate any update. More>>

ALSO:

Lower Levy For Safer Cars: ACC Backtracks On Safety Assessments

Dog and Lemon: “The ACC has based the entire levy system on a set of badly flawed data from Monash University. This Monash data is riddled with errors and false assumptions; that’s the real reason for the multiple mistakes in setting ACC levies.” More>>

ALSO:

Fast Track: TPP Negotiations Set To Accelerate, Groser Says

Negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership will accelerate in July, with New Zealand officials working to stitch up a deal by the month's end, according to Trade Minister Tim Groser. More>>

ALSO:

Floods: Initial Assessment Of Economic Impact

Authorities around the region have compiled an initial impact assessment for the Ministry of Civil Defence, putting the estimated cost of flood recovery at around $120 million... this early estimate includes social, built, and economic costs to business, but doesn’t include costs to the rural sector. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news