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Tuition Fees For 2009


Tuition Fees For 2009

The University of Auckland Council has approved tuition fee increases for 2009.

Tuition fees for undergraduate domestic students will rise by an average 2.7 percent and for postgraduate students by an average 7.8 percent.

The increases are similar to those for 2008, and are largely constrained by the government policy of fees maxima. In light of inadequate government funding, they are absolutely necessary to maintain academic quality, the Vice-Chancellor, Professor Stuart McCutcheon said today.

Government funding for universities will increase by 2.6 percent in 2009, only half the expected increase in the University’s costs, he noted.

“As a result the tuition fee increases will boost revenue by only $4.6 million, $7.8 million less than the amount required simply to maintain our current position. The increases are below the rate of increase in the University’s costs for all undergraduates and well below the CPI for 94 percent of them.”

Professor McCutcheon said student fees in New Zealand remained 25 percent lower than in Australia, Canada, Britain and the US while government expenditure on financial aid to students was the highest in the OECD by a considerable margin. “In contrast, Government expenditure on funding tertiary institutions is relatively low by OECD standards.

“We want our students to be successful, to have a quality education and a good student experience. All political parties need to think about how to balance financial support for students and institutions so that tertiary education delivers on the goals of students, the institutions and the country.”

The University Council also passed a resolution calling on the government to “ensure that no person is denied access to or success in university study by financial constraints”.

Tuition fees for most international students will go up by 5 percent, the projected increase in the University’s costs.

ends

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