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True Car Values

True Car Values

SYDNEY, Nov. 26 /Medianet International-AsiaNet/ --

The festive season – and the busiest time for buying or selling cars.

Now, people all over New Zealand are able to find out the true value of either the vehicle they currently own or a vehicle they are thinking of buying… simply with just a few mouse clicks.

Called “Personalised Valuations” the service is provided by Red Book – the company that provides professional, comprehensive vehicle identification and pricing to the automotive, finance and insurance industries in New Zealand, Australia (and in six other countries in the AsiaPacific region). So it knows its business.

With “Personalised Valuations” the user accesses the information through the Internet … logging into www.redbook.co.nz

After being led through a series of prompts to properly identify the vehicle, the user provides details of the kilometers traveled, the condition of the vehicle (fair, average, good etc) and any additional features added to the vehicle (for example, an up-market sound system).

After payment of a fee of $19.95 incl GST – which can be paid by credit card - Red Book then calculates the value of the vehicle and provides a certificate which can be used in future negotiations.

That’s all there is to it.

Most cars on New Zealand’s roads – including second-hand Japanese imports - can be valued by Red Book with this service.

It’s a simple and effective service which is currently being used to great effect by many, many car buyers and sellers in New Zealand. And because Red Book is universally recognized as the pricing authority, it has great credibility and authority.


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
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