Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Tobacco Tax Increase Places Retailers at Risk

Tobacco Tax Increase Places Retailers at Risk

The increase in tobacco excise forced through Parliament by the Government last night has now made tobacco products a valuable commodity and places retailers at a greater risk of robberies, says the Association of Community Retailers.

ACR founding member and spokesman, Richard Green, said today that the rise in the price of tobacco has now made smokers’ products more valuable and attractive to criminal groups.

Combined with current proposals on the table to ban the display of tobacco products from the retail environment, there are calls for tobacconists who sell only tobacco and tobacco-related products to have their store windows obscured so that people cannot see tobacco products from the street.

“This puts responsible tobacconists like me at huge safety risks. It is nothing for a couple of criminals to walk into my shop, close the door, assault me and steal my tobacco stock – all without being seen because my windows will have to be blacked out under the new rules,” Mr Green said.

All retailers, including dairies, convenience stores and petrol stations, will now be at greater risk to their safety. The tax excise hike will make their premises more susceptible to burglaries at night.

“The government increased tobacco excise at least three times in the last decade all on the basis that it would stop people from smoking. It hasn’t. There is a general reduction throughout the Western world, but there is no silver bullet for making people stop smoking.

“It’s unfortunate because this latest move has only put retailers in a riskier situation,” Mr Green said.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Up 0.5% In June Quarter: Services Lead GDP Growth

“Service industries, which represent about two-thirds of the economy, were the main contributor to GDP growth in the quarter, rising 0.7 percent off the back of a subdued result in the March 2019 quarter.” More>>

ALSO:

Pickers: Letter To Immigration Minister From Early Harvesting Growers

A group of horticultural growers are frustrated by many months of inaction by the Minister who has failed to announce additional immigrant workers from overseas will be allowed into New Zealand to assist with harvesting early stage crops such as asparagus and strawberries. More>>

ALSO:

Non-Giant Fossil Disoveries: Scientists Discover One Of World’s Oldest Bird Species

At 62 million-years-old, the newly-discovered Protodontopteryx ruthae, is one of the oldest named bird species in the world. It lived in New Zealand soon after the dinosaurs died out. More>>

Rural Employers Keen, Migrants Iffy: Employment Visa Changes Announced

“We are committed to ensuring that businesses are able to get the workers they need to fill critical skills shortages, while encouraging employers and regions to work together on long term workforce planning including supporting New Zealanders with the training they need to fill the gaps,” says Iain Lees-Galloway. More>>

ALSO:

Marsden Pipeline Rupture: Report Calls For Supply Improvements, Backs Digger Blame

The report makes several recommendations on how the sector can better prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from an incident. In particular, we consider it essential that government and industry work together to put in place and regularly practise sector-wide response plans, to improve the response to any future incident… More>>

ALSO: