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Beer in Cups a Solution to Crowd Misbehaviour

Beer Served in Cups a Solution to Crowd Misbehaviour

AUCKLAND, Nov. 10 /Medianet International-AsiaNet/ --

Selling beer in plastic cups rather than bottles or cans is the simplest and most cost-effective way to prevent repeats of the crowd behaviour experienced at Auckland’s Eden Park on Saturday, according to a leading drinks dispensing firm.

The NZ Manager of leading beverage dispensing and ice manufacturing company Hoshizaki Lancer, Mr Michael Abraham, said that selling beer or any other drink in bottles and cans at sporting stadia was a recipe for disaster.

An urgent security review is under way after Kiwi rugby league fans hurled bottles on to the pitch as Australia defeated New Zealand 34-20 last Saturday ahead of this week's Four Nations final in Brisbane.

"In most major stadia around the world, drinks are sold in cups to ensure problems such as those experienced at Eden Park last Saturday cannot occur," Mr Abraham said.

"Those who argue against such steps or suggest that dispensing systems cannot keep up with demand are sticking their heads in the sand and just plain wrong.

"Modern beverage dispensers can keep up with the heaviest demand and are a far more efficient way of ensuring people who want a drink get served in a timely manner."

Mr Abraham said if the Eden Park stadium managers were not prepared to voluntarily replace the sale of bottles and invest in modern drink infrastructure, then the Government needed to step in.

"New Zealand will be hosting the Rugby Union World Cup next year and games will be telecast around the world," he said.

"At this stage, stadium officials at Eden Park are still planning to sell beer in 330 ml cans.

"Imagine the international uproar if an international player was hit by a flying beer can or an innocent spectator was badly hurt."

Mr Abraham said other stadiums in New Zealand and all major stadia in Australia had been selling beer in plastic cups for years without a problem.

He said high flow beer dispensers, such as the Lancer Multifill used at the 100,000 seat capacity Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG), were designed to keep up with crowd demand.

"Hoshizaki Lancer also provides the beer system for Wembley Stadium in the United Kingdom, so we are well experienced in meeting this sort of demand," he said.


ENDS

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