Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Beer in Cups a Solution to Crowd Misbehaviour

Beer Served in Cups a Solution to Crowd Misbehaviour

AUCKLAND, Nov. 10 /Medianet International-AsiaNet/ --

Selling beer in plastic cups rather than bottles or cans is the simplest and most cost-effective way to prevent repeats of the crowd behaviour experienced at Auckland’s Eden Park on Saturday, according to a leading drinks dispensing firm.

The NZ Manager of leading beverage dispensing and ice manufacturing company Hoshizaki Lancer, Mr Michael Abraham, said that selling beer or any other drink in bottles and cans at sporting stadia was a recipe for disaster.

An urgent security review is under way after Kiwi rugby league fans hurled bottles on to the pitch as Australia defeated New Zealand 34-20 last Saturday ahead of this week's Four Nations final in Brisbane.

"In most major stadia around the world, drinks are sold in cups to ensure problems such as those experienced at Eden Park last Saturday cannot occur," Mr Abraham said.

"Those who argue against such steps or suggest that dispensing systems cannot keep up with demand are sticking their heads in the sand and just plain wrong.

"Modern beverage dispensers can keep up with the heaviest demand and are a far more efficient way of ensuring people who want a drink get served in a timely manner."

Mr Abraham said if the Eden Park stadium managers were not prepared to voluntarily replace the sale of bottles and invest in modern drink infrastructure, then the Government needed to step in.

"New Zealand will be hosting the Rugby Union World Cup next year and games will be telecast around the world," he said.

"At this stage, stadium officials at Eden Park are still planning to sell beer in 330 ml cans.

"Imagine the international uproar if an international player was hit by a flying beer can or an innocent spectator was badly hurt."

Mr Abraham said other stadiums in New Zealand and all major stadia in Australia had been selling beer in plastic cups for years without a problem.

He said high flow beer dispensers, such as the Lancer Multifill used at the 100,000 seat capacity Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG), were designed to keep up with crowd demand.

"Hoshizaki Lancer also provides the beer system for Wembley Stadium in the United Kingdom, so we are well experienced in meeting this sort of demand," he said.


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

RMTU: Mediation Between Lyttelton Port And Union Fails

The Rail and Maritime Union (RMTU) has opted to continue its overtime ban indefinitely after mediation with the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) failed to progress collective bargaining. More>>

Earlier:

Science Policy: Callaghan, NSC Funding Knocked In Submissions

Callaghan Innovation, which was last year allocated a budget of $566 million over four years to dish out research and development grants, and the National Science Challenges attracted criticism in submissions on the government’s draft national statement of science investment, with science funding largely seen as too fragmented. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Spark, Voda And Telstra To Lay New Trans-Tasman Cable

Spark New Zealand and Vodafone, New Zealand’s two dominant telecommunications providers, in partnership with Australian provider Telstra, will spend US$70 million building a trans-Tasman submarine cable to bolster broadband traffic between the neighbouring countries and the rest of the world. More>>

ALSO:

More:

Statistics: Current Account Deficit Widens

New Zealand's annual current account deficit was $6.1 billion (2.6 percent of GDP) for the year ended September 2014. This compares with a deficit of $5.8 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) for the year ended June 2014. More>>

ALSO:

Still In The Red: NZ Govt Shunts Out Surplus To 2016

The New Zealand government has pushed out its targeted return to surplus for a year as falling dairy prices and a low inflation environment has kept a lid on its rising tax take, but is still dangling a possible tax cut in 2017, the next election year and promising to try and achieve the surplus pledge on which it campaigned for election in September. More>>

ALSO:

Job Insecurity: Time For Jobs That Count In The Meat Industry

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, Meat Workers Union National Secretary. “Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news