Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


New ways to fund infrastructure investment required

New ways to fund infrastructure investment required


"The New Zealand Council for Infrastructure Development supports a review of infrastructure investments in the light of the investment challenge in Christchurch, but says now this is not the time for any knee jerk cut backs to an agreed investment programme for Christchurch, or the nation as a whole", says NZCID Chief Executive Stephen Selwood.

"We need to find new ways to fund new investment."

This was in response to reported comments by Finance Minister Bill English that some big infrastructure projects could be delayed because of the need to pay for reconstruction in Christchurch.

"A measured and balanced response to the Christchurch earthquake is now required", Selwood says.
"Investment in productive infrastructure, including high speed broadband and transport connections into and within our major cities is a fundamental platform of the government's growth agenda.

"Rather than cut back on infrastructure that will be the very foundation of our future cities, we must find a way to rebuild Christchurch and fund the infrastructure investment for growth. In the long run, that is the very approach that will make us even stronger in the face of adversity.

"There are a variety of alternative approaches to funding future investment which, in combination, provides us the means to pay for much needed infrastructure investment. The redevelopment of Christchurch could be financed by a NZ wide earthquake levy. Partial asset sell downs is another approach. The future development of transport, water and waste water network in our major cities could be paid for by low cost network tolls and user charges.

"In Auckland an average toll of just $2.00 per vehicle on the Auckland motorway network, higher at peak and lower off peak, would be sufficient to fund the existing planned investment programme, and major new projects that are approved as part of the Auckland plan currently being developed.

"Tolls have been used to fund the Northern Gateway north of Auckland, are planned for the Tauranga Eastern Arterial and could also be used to help fund the Waikato Expressway, Transmission Gully and the Christchurch motorway network, for example. It seems unusual to use tolls in some parts of the country and not others.

"Funding major infrastructure investment was an issue before the earthquake and will always be a challenge. Using tolls and user charges as a means to help fund new infrastructure investment is an issue that needs multi-party political support. It is the very thing that Labour, the Greens, the Progressive Party, Act, United Future and the Maori party could support as a means to help build and rebuild the infrastructure that our country depends on.

"In the past we have dealt with that challenge by deferring the very investment that is required to lift productivity and improve urban development. It's time to adopt new ways of doing things", says Selwood.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Must Sell 20 Petrol Stations: Z Cleared To Buy Caltex Assets

Z Energy is allowed to buy the Caltex and Challenge! petrol station chains but must sell 19 of its retail sites and one truck-stop, the Commerce Commission has ruled in a split decision that acknowledges possible retail price coordination between fuel retailers occurs in some regions. More>>

ALSO:

Huntly: Genesis Extends Life Of Coal-Fuelled Power Station To 2022

Genesis Energy will keep its two coal and gas-fired units at Huntly Power Station operating until 2022, having previously said they'd be closed by 2018, after wringing a high price from other electricity generators who wanted to keep them as back-up. More>>

ALSO:

Dammed If You Do: Ruataniwha Irrigation Scheme Hits Farmer Uptake Targets

Enough Hawke's Bay farmers have signed up for water from the proposed Ruataniwha Water Storage Scheme for it to go ahead as long as a cornerstone institutional capital investor can be found to back it, its regional council promoter announced. More>>

ALSO:

Reserve Bank: OCR Stays At 2.25%

Reserve Bank governor Graeme Wheeler kept the official cash rate at 2.25 percent, in a decision traders had said could go either way, while predicting inflation will pick up as the slump in oil prices washes out of the data and capacity pressures start to build in the economy. More>>

ALSO:

Export Values Down: NZ Posts Biggest Annual Trade Deficit In 7 Years

New Zealand has recorded its biggest annual trade deficit since April 2009, reflecting weaker prices of agricultural commodities such as dairy products, beef and lamb, and increased imports of vehicles and machinery. More>>

ALSO:

Currency Events: NZ's New $5 Note Wins International Banknote Award

New Zealand’s new Brighter Money $5 note has been named Banknote of the Year in a prestigious international competition. The $5 note was awarded the IBNS Banknote of the Year title at the International Bank Note Society’s annual meeting. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news