Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

New strategy to ensure tourists still come to Christchurch

New strategy to ensure tourists still come to Christchurch

Christchurch International Airport (CIAL) is working with the tourism industry to develop a new strategy to ensure tourists continue to fly in and out of Christchurch Airport to travel in the South Island.

“We have always been the major gateway for international travellers to come to the South Island and we still intend to be,” said CIAL Chief Executive Jim Boult. “Tourists spend $4.3 billion a year in the South Island, so keeping this industry alive and thriving is vital to the renewal of Christchurch and the well-being of the South Island economy.”

A team from Christchurch Airport, Christchurch and Canterbury Tourism, and Tourism New Zealand met to discuss ways to reassure travellers that New Zealand is still a great place to visit.

“A large percentage of hotel rooms in Christchurch are unavailable because they are damaged or are in the CBD,” explained Jim Boult. “So one of the key issues is how to move people quickly and easily from the airport to remaining accommodation both within and outside Christchurch.”

He went on to say that there is still some accommodation in Christchurch as most motels have continued operating. “There are approximately 1900 motel rooms in Christchurch, mostly in the suburbs. Ninety five percent of the motels in Christchurch are operational. At the moment, these are full with emergency response personnel, but they will gradually become available for travellers in the near future.”

Christchurch Airport is arranging a meeting next week of all Regional Tourism offices and airlines involved in the South Island to address the issue of maintaining a strong tourism industry
…END

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

By May 2018: Wider, Earlier Microbead Ban

The sale and manufacture of wash-off products containing plastic microbeads will be banned in New Zealand earlier than previously expected, Associate Environment Minister Scott Simpson announced today. More>>

ALSO:

Snail-ier Mail: NZ Post To Ditch FastPost

New Zealand Post customers will see a change to how they can send priority mail from 1 January 2018. The FastPost service will no longer be available from this date. More>>

ALSO:

Property Institute: English Backs Of Debt To Income Plan

Property Institute of New Zealand Chief Executive Ashley Church is applauding today’s decision, by Prime Minister Bill English, to take Debt-to-income ratios off the table as a tool available to the Reserve Bank. More>>

ALSO:

Divesting: NZ Super Fund Shifts Passive Equities To Low-Carbon

The NZ$35 billion NZ Super Fund’s NZ$14 billion global passive equity portfolio, 40% of the overall Fund, is now low-carbon, the Guardians of New Zealand Superannuation announced today. More>>

ALSO:

Split Decision - Appeal Planned: EPA Allows Taranaki Bight Seabed Mine

The Decision-making Committee, appointed by the Board of the Environmental Protection Authority to decide a marine consent application by Trans-Tasman Resources Ltd, has granted consent, subject to conditions, for the company to mine iron sands off the South Taranaki Bight. More>>

ALSO: