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Main Report Group Battles Through Earthquake Chaos

Main Report Group Battles Through Earthquake Chaos

Full Production To Resume Soon

The Main Report Group, publishers of the prestigious Trans Tasman Political Week, as well as NZ Energy & Environment Business Week, NZ Transport Intelligence Business Week, The Main Report Business Week, The Main Report’s Agri-Business Week and NZ Health & Wealth Report, has managed to overcome the destruction of its central Christchurch offices for the second time in six months, to be at the point where full production is about to resume.

An issue of Trans Tasman was actually produced in time for electronic distribution to clients on Thursday the 24th of February – a massive feat, given the scale of the disruption suffered by the long-running publications group.

“We owed it to our clients and to ourselves” says Publisher In Chief Max Bowden. “These news weeklies have been going out without fail since 1974, and we weren’t going to let this stop us if at all possible.”

While electronic clients have been well served, the fact the data base for the business was locked in a partially ruined building has made it harder for print clients. However a dramatic visit to the condemned offices has resulted in the recovery of valuable servers and the business should be back in full production in a week.

Max Bowden says while the businesses’ data was backed up, and quick thinking staff managed to retrieve back up data sticks, software and hardware issues have caused problems. The destruction of supplier business premises has also made things more difficult.

He says finding more secure and accessible back up locations will be one of the key priorities for the business. He says all staff managed to exit the badly damaged building safely, and their families were fine as well.

The Main Report Group would encourage its customers to be patient, and they will be contacted in the near future. Max Bowden says they will be getting bonus issues added to their subscriptions to make up for the disruption to their service.

© Scoop Media

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