Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Telecom asks for break on rural broadband pricing

Telecom asks for break on rural broadband pricing

by Paul McBeth

March 29 (BusinessDesk) – Telecom Corp., which is fighting to win a chunk of government funding to build a national broadband network, has asked for a break on its regulatory burden over the delivery of rural internet.

Communications Minister Steven Joyce is seeking submissions on whether the country’s biggest phone company should be allowed to charge more for services delivered by the government’s rural broadband initiative (RBU) than the subsidised deal for schools and hospitals.

Telecom wants to ensure any fibre services that are technically the same or similar to what it would be required to offer under the RBI wouldn’t have to be offered on the same terms as those subsidised by the government.

The government’s rural plan aims to give 80% of rural households internet speeds at least 5 megabits a second, with the remainder getting 1 Mbps.

The government will put in some $50 million of funding towards the build, with the remainder coming through a contestable levy on telecommunication service providers that’s replacing the old agreement with Telecom to provide phone services to remote places.

Community hubs, schools and hospitals are expected to get fibre enabling broadband speeds of at least 100 mbps.

Telecom and mobile phone rival Vodafone New Zealand Ltd. are negotiating with the Ministry of Economic Development in a joint bid to win the right to deliver high-speed internet services over what would be a combination of mobile broadband, fixed wireless and enhanced copper services.

Joyce is asking for submissions on the variation request until April 5. Shares in Telecom rose 1.8% to $2.02 in trading today, and have dropped 9.5% this year.

(BusinessDesk) 15:01:52

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Our Fresh Water: Monitoring Report Confirms Serious Challenges For Rivers

• nitrogen levels are getting worse at 55 percent and getting better at 28 percent of monitored river sites across New Zealand • phosphorus levels are getting better at 42 percent and getting worse at 25 percent of monitored river sites across New Zealand More>>

ALSO:

Stats: Wind And Geothermal Emerge As Significant Sources Of Energy

Geothermal’s contribution to New Zealand’s total renewable energy generation increased from 11.5 percent in 2007 to 21 percent in 2015.... The value of wind jumped from $238 million (2 percent of total renewable energy generation) in 2007 to $884 million (6 percent) in 2015. More>>

Errors Found: Electricity Authority Dumps Transmission Pricing Modelling

The Electricity Authority is ditching the cost-benefit analysis at the heart of its controversial attempt to find a new way to divide up costs for the national grid after finding an expanding range of serious computational errors in the work by Australian consultancy Oakley Greenwood. More>>

ALSO:

New Record: Migrant Arrivals At 129,500 A Year

Annual net migration has been steadily increasing since 2012. "This was mainly due to the rising number of migrant arrivals to New Zealand," population statistics senior manager Peter Dolan said. "Fewer migrant departures also contributed to the increase in net migration." More>>

ALSO:

Launched: NASA's Super Pressure Balloon Takes Flight From NZ

NASA successfully launched its football-stadium-sized, heavy-lift super pressure balloon (SPB) from Wanaka, New Zealand, at10:50 a.m. Tuesday, April 25 (6:50 p.m. April 24 in U.S. Eastern Time), on a mission designed to run 100 or more days floating at 110,000 feet (33.5 km) about the globe in the southern hemisphere's mid-latitude band. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news