Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Tropical Timber Importers urged to ban all kwila imports

Indonesia Human Rights Committee
And Rainforest Action, Auckland,
Box 68-419,
Auckland.


6 June, 2011

Media Release: Tropical Timber Importers urged to ban all kwila imports


The Indonesia Human Rights Group and Rainforest Action commend the New Zealand Imported Tropical Timber Group (NZITTG) for its recent initiative in setting up a voluntary code of practice concerning illegally logged wood. From September NZITTG members will only import tropical timber products which have ‘credible third party verification of their legality of source.’

This is a step in the right direction, but we now urge the NZITTG to consider an additional ban on all imports of the tropical hardwood kwila, whether or not is certified ‘legal’.

Most of the kwila coming into this country comes from Indonesian controlled West Papua. It is a species under threat of extinction within a generation; it is sparse growing and takes up to 80 years to grow to maturity.

The NZITTG code will reduce the amount of kwila being imported, but under the proposed code of practice some kwila may still be imported to New Zealand.

A certificate of legality does not ensure that the product comes from a sustainably managed forest. Moreover, Indonesia’s regulatory system is weak and vulnerable to corrupt practices. The authorities are subject to huge pressure to allow forest clearance for the sake of lucrative palm oil plantations.

In Aotearoa we don’t log kauri to preserve the forests that remain, to be morally consistent we should be just as respectful of old growth forests in West Papua.

In the last 15 years millions of hectares of West Papua’s old growth forests have been felled – some 25 % of the total forest area. Military personnel are employed as security for legal and illegal logging operations and indigenous Papuans have no say over resource extraction.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Non-Giant Fossil Disoveries: Scientists Discover One Of World’s Oldest Bird Species

At 62 million-years-old, the newly-discovered Protodontopteryx ruthae, is one of the oldest named bird species in the world. It lived in New Zealand soon after the dinosaurs died out. More>>

Rural Employers Keen, Migrants Iffy: Employment Visa Changes Announced

“We are committed to ensuring that businesses are able to get the workers they need to fill critical skills shortages, while encouraging employers and regions to work together on long term workforce planning including supporting New Zealanders with the training they need to fill the gaps,” says Iain Lees-Galloway. More>>

ALSO:

Marsden Pipeline Rupture: Report Calls For Supply Improvements, Backs Digger Blame

The report makes several recommendations on how the sector can better prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from an incident. In particular, we consider it essential that government and industry work together to put in place and regularly practise sector-wide response plans, to improve the response to any future incident… More>>

ALSO:

Oil Scare: Trump Authorises Use Of Emergency Crude Stockpile

The New Zealand dollar fell against the US dollar after President Donald Trump authorised the use of the country's emergency crude stockpile after the weekend attack on Saudi Arabia’s major oil facilities. More>>

ALSO: