Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Employee’s Fingers Amputated in Machine Accident

5 March 2012

Employee’s Fingers Amputated in Machine Accident

Joint venture partners Green Crow Corporation and Ribbonwood Sawmilling Ltd have today been fined a total of $55,000, after one of its employees suffered serious injuries to their right hand after it became trapped in the circular saw he was working on.

The joint venture partners were also ordered to pay reparation of $20,000 following the accident in Fielding on 16 March 2011.

The Palmerston North District Court heard that the employee was using a drop saw to cut regulated lengths of timber. The stopper on the machine kept moving resulting in longer pieces of timber than was required, and therefore needed trimming.

“While re-cutting the timber, the employee leaned over the machine to reach and remove the off-cuts,” says the Department’s Central General Manager Ona De Rooy.

“Unfortunately he lost his balance and stepped on the unguarded foot pedal, causing his right hand to become clamped in the drop saw.

“Neither the foot pedal or the circular blade had any form of guarding, making this piece of machinery very dangerous to use,” says Ms De Rooy

“This employee had not received adequate safety training for using the saw, and therefore he was not aware of the hazards he was exposed to. Consequently his thumb, middle and ring fingers were amputated and his index finger was fractured.

“Last year the Department received 1,146 serious harm notifications from the manufacturing industry. This number is simply too high and in many cases, like this one, if some basic safety precautions had been in place the accident may have been prevented,” Ms De Rooy says.

Green Crow Corporation Limited was convicted on one charge under Section 6 of the Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992 which states:

Every employer shall take all practicable steps to ensure the safety of employees while at work; and in particular shall take all practicable steps to—
o (a) provide and maintain for employees a safe working environment; and
o (b) provide and maintain for employees while they are at work facilities for their safety and health; and
o (c) ensure that plant used by any employee at work is so arranged, designed, made, and maintained that it is safe for the employee to use; and
o (d) ensure that while at work employees are not exposed to hazards arising out of the arrangement, disposal, manipulation, organisation, processing, storage, transport, working, or use of things—
(i) in their place of work; or
(ii) near their place of work and under the employer's control; and
o (e) develop procedures for dealing with emergencies that may arise while employees are at work.

Ribbonwood Sawmilling Ltd was convicted on one charge under Section 6 of the Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992 which states:

Every employer shall take all practicable steps to ensure the safety of employees while at work; and in particular shall take all practicable steps to—
o (a) provide and maintain for employees a safe working environment; and
o (b) provide and maintain for employees while they are at work facilities for their safety and health; and
o (c) ensure that plant used by any employee at work is so arranged, designed, made, and maintained that it is safe for the employee to use; and
o (d) ensure that while at work employees are not exposed to hazards arising out of the arrangement, disposal, manipulation, organisation, processing, storage, transport, working, or use of things—
(i) in their place of work; or
(ii) near their place of work and under the employer's control; and
o (e) develop procedures for dealing with emergencies that may arise while employees are at work.

The Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992 is available online.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Post-Post: Brian Roche To Step Down As NZ Post CEO

Brian Roche will step down as chief executive of New Zealand Post in April 2017, having led the state-owned postal service's drive to adjust to shrinking mail volumes with a combination of cost cuts, asset sales, modernisation and expansion of new businesses. More>>

ALSO:

Company Results: Air NZ Rides The Tourism Boom With Record Full-Year Earnings

Air New Zealand has ridden the tourism boom and staved off increased competition to deliver the best full-year earnings in its 76-year history. More>>

ALSO:

New PGP: Sheep Milk Industry Gets $12.6M Crown Funding

The Sheep - Horizon Three programme aims to develop "a market driven, end-to-end value chain generating annual revenues of between $200 million and $700 million by 2030," according to a joint statement. More>>

ALSO:

Half Full: Fonterra Raises Forecast Milk Price

Fonterra Co-operative Group Limited today increased its 2016/17 forecast Farmgate Milk Price by 50 cents to $4.75 per kgMS. When combined with the forecast earnings per share range for the 2017 financial year of 50 to 60 cents, the total payout available to farmers in the current season is forecast to be $5.25 to $5.35 before retentions. More>>

ALSO:

Keep Digging: Seabed Ironsands Miner TransTasman Tries Again

The first company to attempt to gain a resource consent to mine ironsands from the ocean floor in New Zealand's Exclusive Economic Zone has lodged a new application containing fresh scientific and other evidence it hopes will persuade regulators after their initial application was turned down in 2014. More>>

Wool Pulled: Duvets Sold As ‘Premium Alpaca’ Mostly Sheep’s Wool

Rotorua business Budge Collection Limited (Budge) and sole director, Sun Dong Kim, were convicted and fined a total of $71,250 in Auckland District Court after each pleading guilty to four charges of misrepresenting how much alpaca fibre was in their duvets. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news