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Emirates Adds Further to A380, Boeing Fleets


News Release, 3 October 2012

Emirates Adds Further to A380, Boeing Fleets

Emirates, on the day that it introduced double-daily A380 service to Auckland, took delivery of its 24th and 25th Airbus A380s and its 78th Boeing 777-300 yesterday.

The aircraft will be immediately engaged into service across Emirates network of 126 destinations in 74 countries; supporting Emirates’ planned expansion of its network and flights. The delivery of three wide-body aircraft in one day, a record for Emirates, required careful review and advance preparation within all operational units to ensure the availability of the required flight crew, cabin crew, engineers, airport staff in time to ensure a smooth entry into service.

“With its large capacity and excellent operating economics, the A380 is one of the pillars of Emirates’ future growth. Our A380s are specifically deployed on high density routes where extra capacity is needed and have been well-received by passengers,” said Adel al Redha, Emirates Executive Vice-President of Engineering and Operations.

“Similarly, as the world's largest 777 operator and the only airline in the world to operate every model in the Boeing 777 family, including the 777 Freighter, our Boeings provide reliability, performance and the operating economics Emirates requires to support our ambitious and strategic growth plans. Both the aircraft types exemplify our commitment to operating a modern fleet for the benefit of our passengers.”

With 25 A380 aircraft now in its fleet, growing to 31 by the end of 2012, Emirates is the largest A380 operator worldwide and with another 65 jets on firm order by far the largest A380 customer. The Dubai-based carrier was the first airline to order the A380 and thus enabled Airbus to proceed with the programme. The further 65 Airbus A380s on Emirates’ order book are part of Emirates’ overall 216 aircraft still to be delivered; worth US62 billion.

Emirates’ fleet of A380s currently serve Amsterdam, Auckland, Bangkok, Beijing, Hong Kong, Jeddah, Kuala Lumpur, London Heathrow, Manchester, Melbourne, Munich, New York JFK, Paris, Rome, Seoul, Shanghai, Sydney, Tokyo and Toronto. From December, Moscow and Singapore will receive Emirates A380 service. In early 2013, Emirates will expand operations at Dubai in the world’s first exclusive A380 terminal, Concourse A, at Dubai International Airport.

-ends

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