Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


Blue sky thinking from green fingered finalists

Blue sky thinking from green fingered finalists

Ideas that cut the cost of heating propagation beds to grow plants and turn frost fans into power generators are just two of the six projects being developed by the finalists for the Agmardt Market Innovation project in the 2012 Young Horticulturist of the Year Competition. Other innovation ideas include collapsible crates for freighting small plants, an instant rollout flower mat, and a design that takes weeding to a new level.

Six finalists from around New Zealand who have won their industry sector competitions are preparing for the intensive two day competition on November 14 and 15 in Auckland.

“The standard this year is amazing; I think the judges will have difficulty selecting the winner,” says Nicola Rochester, Chair of the RNZIH Education Trust, which manages the competition.

The six sectors that the finalists represent are Floristry, Horticulture, Landscaping, Nursery and Garden, NZ Recreation Association- Amenity Horticulture and NZ Winegrowers.

The competition is similar to the Young Farmer of the Year, with practical, specialist, technical and marketing skills being tested across the two days. Finalists (30 years and under) are competing for a first prize that includes a $7,500 travel and accommodation package, with a second prize of $5,500 Massey University study scholarship and travel.

“There are the tangible rewards, but just as important we find that the networking, experience and further education add so much to the careers of these young achievers,” Nicola explains.

The competition, managed by the RNZIH Education Trust on behalf of the sponsors including Agmardt, Fruitfed Supplies, and Turners and Growers is designed to develop the finalists’ skills and knowledge and enhance their career opportunities in the horticulture industry.

Finalists from previous years have travelled to America, Europe and the UK to broaden their industry experience, returning to apply their learning in New Zealand.

Winners will be announced at the Young Horticulturist of the Year dinner at the Rendezvous Hotel, Auckland on Thursday November 15, 2012.


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Banks: Westpac Keeps Core Government Transactions Contract

The local arm of Westpac Banking Corp has kept its contract with the New Zealand government to provide core transactions, but will have to share peripheral services with its rivals. More>>


Science Investment Plan: Universities Welcome Statement

Universities New Zealand has welcomed the National Statement of Science Investment released by the Government today... this is a critical document as it sets out the Government’s ten-year strategic direction that will guide future investment in New Zealand’s science system. More>>


Scouring: Cavalier Merger Would Extract 'Monopoly Rents' - Godfrey Hirst

A merger of Cavalier Wool Holdings and New Zealand Wool Services International's two wool scouring operations would create a monopoly, says carpet maker Godfrey Hirst. The Commerce Commission on Friday released its second draft determination on the merger, maintaining its view that the public benefits would outweigh the loss of competition. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: She Means Business

As Foreman says in her conclusion, this is a business book. It opens with a brief biographical section followed by a collection of interesting tips for entrepreneurs... More>>


Hourly Wage Gap Grows: Gender Pay Gap Still Fixed At Fourteen Percent

“The totally unchanged pay gap is a slap in the face for women, families and the economy,” says Coalition spokesperson, Angela McLeod. Even worse, Māori and Pacific women face an outrageous pay gap of 28% and 33% when compared with the pay packets of Pākehā men. More>>


Housing: English On Housing Affordability And The Economy

"Long lead times in the planning process tend to drive prices higher in the upswing of the housing cycle. And those lead times increase the risk that eight years later, when additional supply arrives, the demand shock that spurred the additional supply has reversed. The resulting excess supply could produce a price crash..." More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news