Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


Textiles: Energy Assessments Find $380,000 Annual Savings

Energy Assessments Find More Than $380,000 Annual Savings For Textiles Businesses

6 November 2012

An energy efficiency programme could save ten textiles companies up to $381,000 this year.

The ten companies signed up to the Textiles Sector Energy Efficiency Programme following its launch in July this year.

The Textile Industry of NZ Association Inc (Textiles NZ) programme is funded by the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA) and provides member companies with half-price energy assessments.

The specialist advice on how to reduce on-site energy use has revealed a total of 8.4 gigawatt-hours of annual energy savings - equivalent to the energy use of 730 houses.

Demand for the Textiles NZ assessments has been very high. Ten assessments have been completed since the programme began with ten more currently being scheduled.

Textiles Energy Efficiency Programme Coordinator Simon Wilkinson says the assessment is an essential step in the development of sustainable energy solutions for the textile industry.

For each assessment, an accredited energy expert from Textiles NZ partner, Energy NZ Ltd, spends at least half a day on site and assesses all major energy using equipment.

Opportunities to improve efficiency are identified and our contracted engineers estimate how many kilowatt-hours will be saved, how much it will cost to invest in the opportunity, and therefore, how much the company will save on energy costs,” says Mr Wilkinson.

There have already been some great examples of energy saving, such as at La Nuova Apparelmaster in Taranaki, where auditors have found energy savings that will reduce La Nuova’s energy bills by 26% and save them $36,543 a year.

The textile sector energy efficiency programme worked really well for us here at La Nuova, we had both our dry-cleaning plant and our laundry audited,” says Brad Craig, of La Nuova. “I was impressed with the level of detail that the auditor went into.”

After the assessment a Textiles NZ programme coordinator works with the company to develop an action plan to realise the energy savings.

Additional support is given to create an energy policy, set up energy monitoring, and, wherever possible, tap into funding sources that are available to support the purchase of energy efficient technology. Companies are supported over a 9-month period in order to achieve the estimated savings.

Mr Wilkinson says each plant is assessed taking into account its unique set-up and solutions are tailored to the needs of the business.

The textiles sector contains such a variety of business types so it is very difficult to generalise about energy efficiency opportunities. There are huge differences between a wool-spinning plant and a garment assembly operation, for example.

He advises that assessments typically find a number of energy saving opportunities that are zero cost, or that are very low cost to implement and have a payback of less than one year. There are also medium term opportunities which payback in one to three years.

And then there can be the large capital cost opportunities that deliver significant levels of savings with longer payback. For these significant opportunities there is often funding available in New Zealand to shorten the payback period,” says Mr Wilkinson.

The Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA) offers a grant of up to 40% towards the capital costs of new equipment that delivers energy savings for a business. The Textiles NZ programme assists companies in applying for this funding.


Cost of assessment: $1,000

Sites assessed: 10

Savings identified: $381,067

Average savings for each company: 17% of annual energy costs

Click for big version.

Summary of the energy savings found for 10 New Zealand textiles companies under the Textiles NZ 2012 energy efficiency programme

Click for big version.


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Trade: NZ Trade Deficit Widens To A Record In September

Oct. 27 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand's monthly trade deficit widened to a record in September as meat exports dropped to their lowest level in more than three years. More>>


Animal Welfare: Cruel Practices Condemned By DairyNZ Chief

DairyNZ chief executive Tim Mackle says cruel and illegal practices are not in any way condoned or accepted by the industry as part of dairy farming.

Tim says the video released today by Farmwatch shows some footage of transport companies and their workers, as well as some unacceptable behaviour by farmers of dragging calves. More>>


Postnatal Depression: 'The Thief That Steals Motherhood' - Alison McCulloch

Post-natal depression is a sly and cruel illness, described by one expert as ‘the thief that steals motherhood’, it creeps up on its victims, hiding behind the stress and exhaustion of being a new parent, catching many women unaware and unprepared. More>>


DIY: Kiwi Ingenuity And Masking Tape Saves Chick

Kiwi ingenuity and masking tape has saved a Kiwi chick after its egg was badly damaged endangering the chick's life. The egg was delivered to Kiwi Encounter at Rainbow Springs in Rotorua 14 days ago by a DOC worker with a large hole in its shell and against all odds has just successfully hatched. More>>


International Trade: Key To Lead Mission To India; ASEAN FTA Review Announced

Prime Minister John Key will lead a trade delegation to India next week, saying the pursuit of a free trade agreement with the protectionist giant is "the primary reason we're going" but playing down the likelihood of early progress. More>>



MYOB: Digital Signatures Go Live

From today, Inland Revenue will begin accepting “digital signatures”, saving businesses and their accountants a huge amount of administration time and further reducing the need for pen and paper in the workplace. More>>

Oil Searches: Norway's Statoil Quits Reinga Basin

Statoil, the Norwegian state-owned oil company, has given up oil and gas exploration in Northland's Reinga Basin, saying the probably of a find was 'too low'. More>>


Modern Living: Auckland Development Blowouts Reminiscent Of Run Up To GFC

The collapse of property developments in Auckland is "almost groundhog day" to the run-up of the global financial crisis in 2007/2008 as banks refuse to fund projects due to blowouts in construction and labour costs, says John Kensington, the author of KPMG's Financial Institutions Performance Survey. More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news