Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


Industry delivers shocking customer service levels

Press Release

KiwiHost New Zealand

9 November 2012

Telecommunications industry delivers shocking customer service levels – annual KiwiHost Customer Service Pulse

Customer service in New Zealand is getting worse according to 36 per cent of Kiwis, while “happiness ratings” are plumbing the depths for Government, ISPs and particularly the telecommunications industry.

Of the more than 600 New Zealanders surveyed in the fourth national annual KiwiHost Customer Service Pulse, 48 per cent said they were satisfied with the level of customer service in New Zealand – a reverse on previous years when the trend was upwards (54 per cent in 2010).

KiwiHost Managing Director, Jared Brixton, says that customer service in New Zealand remains a mixed bag.

“On a company by company basis, Air New Zealand scored the highest overall Happiness Rating of 79.6 and Slingshot fared the worst with a Happiness Rating of minus 23.8 (in effect, an Unhappiness Rating),” Mr Brixton said.

At an industry level, banks, hotels and the automotive industry lead the way when it comes to happy customers.

Previous research conducted by KiwiHost has shown that respondents have a more favourable perception of the level of customer service provided by banks. This year the Banks were pipped to the post by both the automotive repair and hotels/motels industries.

The motor repair industry, hotels/motels, banking and the accounting/legal professions were the only industries that finished with a ‘Happiness Rating’ higher than 50 per cent.

“People used to give the banks a hard time, but that’s not what the facts say at all. They have really lifted their game, but telecommunications companies continue to be consistently poor.

“You have to wonder when they will start listening. It’s a bit hard to argue that they have high numbers of customers when banks and power companies do too, and don't do nearly as badly.

“Overall, if you're going to deal with telecommunications companies, Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and local government, then good luck. There doesn’t look like there’s much of a chance of getting good service there,” he said.

Alarmingly, telecommunications, ISPs, local councils and Government agencies actually scored a negative ‘Happiness Rating’.

“We didn’t expect anybody to score a negative rating.”

Within the telecommunications sector, 2Degrees was the clear favourite with 50 per cent satisfied respondents and the least dissatisfaction at just 12 per cent.

TelstraClear however was on the other end of the scale with 22 per cent satisfied respondents and the largest percentage of unsatisfied respondents at a massive 50 per cent, leaving them with an overall Happiness Rating of minus 18.18

“2Degrees, Vodafone and Telecom should all be congratulated for scoring a positive Happiness Rating in an industry that scored the worst overall Happiness Rating.

“However, it’s clear that they still have a wee way to go. A rating of less than 40 out of 100 clearly indicates they still have work to do if they want to retain existing customers and win new ones,” Mr Brixton said.

He points out that that Kiwis participating in the KiwiHost Customer Service Pulse since 2008 have made it clear that that their needs are not complicated and should be simple to fulfil. Again customers are saying:

Listen to me
Demonstrate a willingness to help me
Take responsibility for meeting my needs

Topping the customer wish list however, and then by some margin, is the plea to ‘listen and understand my needs’.

“These results should give a kick in the pants to some organisations and hopefully a realisation that service is not something that can be tucked under the rug. It is highly relevant to a company’s reputation, brand and overall success.


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Postnatal Depression: 'The Thief That Steals Motherhood' - Alison McCulloch

Post-natal depression is a sly and cruel illness, described by one expert as ‘the thief that steals motherhood’, it creeps up on its victims, hiding behind the stress and exhaustion of being a new parent, catching many women unaware and unprepared. More>>


DIY: Kiwi Ingenuity And Masking Tape Saves Chick

Kiwi ingenuity and masking tape has saved a Kiwi chick after its egg was badly damaged endangering the chick's life. The egg was delivered to Kiwi Encounter at Rainbow Springs in Rotorua 14 days ago by a DOC worker with a large hole in its shell and against all odds has just successfully hatched. More>>


Trade: Key To Lead Mission To India; ASEAN FTA Review Announced

Prime Minister John Key will lead a trade delegation to India next week, saying the pursuit of a free trade agreement with the protectionist giant is "the primary reason we're going" but playing down the likelihood of early progress. More>>



MYOB: Digital Signatures Go Live

From today, Inland Revenue will begin accepting “digital signatures”, saving businesses and their accountants a huge amount of administration time and further reducing the need for pen and paper in the workplace. More>>

Oil Searches: Norway's Statoil Quits Reinga Basin

Statoil, the Norwegian state-owned oil company, has given up oil and gas exploration in Northland's Reinga Basin, saying the probably of a find was 'too low'. More>>


Modern Living: Auckland Development Blowouts Reminiscent Of Run Up To GFC

The collapse of property developments in Auckland is "almost groundhog day" to the run-up of the global financial crisis in 2007/2008 as banks refuse to fund projects due to blowouts in construction and labour costs, says John Kensington, the author of KPMG's Financial Institutions Performance Survey. More>>


Health: New Zealand's First ‘No Sugary Drinks’ Logo Unveiled

New Zealand’s first “no sugary drinks logo” has been unveiled at an event in Wellington... It will empower communities around New Zealand to lift their health and wellbeing and send a clear message about the damage caused by too much sugar in our diets. More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news